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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys. My 996 has about 20k miles on it. I bought it back in August. I am pretty sure it has the original clutch and basket. I only cruise around town on it. Some highway use but NO track use.

My questions are:
1) I have attached a pic. It's the only ones I have at the moment of my clutch. The tabs on the plates looked wrecked to me but wanted to know what yall think. I do have a little slippage/chatter when pulling away from a light. Is it time to replace it or am I just being paranoid because of how loud it is and those tabs being hammered so much? Should I look into putting those funds into maybe a slave cylinder or new master first?

2) If I should replace the clutch, I was looking into replacing it with either a EVR clutch basket and plate set or the Barnett basket and plates. EVR or Barnett? Is there enough of a difference to worry about or just pick one? I am going standard 12t with organic plates. Or could I get by with just new plates and leave the stock basket?

As a note, I am also replacing the pressure plate and springs as well.

Thanks for help.
 

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New plates and new basket. They’re totally fucked. Barnett or EVR doesn’t matter as long as it’s cheaper than stock. If you can afford it get a slipper and wonder why ducati didn’t fit them as standard.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
New plates and new basket. They’re totally fucked. Barnett or EVR doesn’t matter as long as it’s cheaper than stock. If you can afford it get a slipper and wonder why ducati didn’t fit them as standard.
Thanks for the quick response. I will replace the whole thing. Not sure about going with a slipper though. I drive primarily around town with a lot of stop and go. I admittedly dont know much about slipper clutches only that they are more suited for the track and not city driving.

Agreed, they are toast.
Its the back forth tapping that kills them.
On WOT they wont see any tapping at all -> PIN IT :D
Thanks. And not much WOT for me. I ride this thing way more subdued than it was designed for that is for sure.
 

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Maybe I like the noise but functionally those can be made to work just fine. If you want a quiet clutch I agree that you need to change basket and plates if you simply want to make the clutch function as normal (except noise) then try this first.

1. remove the clutch pack and surface all steel plates, you need all those dots you see removed and the plates flat again. The dots are the curled bits of metal from the fiber plates that have broken off and fallen in between the plates. This causes the groaning noise as you pull away as it is high spots that are not wanting to slip as you are trying to slip the clutch pulling away. Remove the high spots and you remove the noise.

2. The tabs on the fiber plates will continue to fall in if you do not clean them up so take a grinder,file etc and remove all curled up metal on the plates. Try to keep all plates as uniform as you can and remove as little material as possible. Know that the larger the plate to basket gap the faster the wear so expect to do this operation more often as the parts wear. Once you get close to 1/2 plate tab thickness I would toss them. I have a plate on the wall that was about 1/2 worn (tab) and worked fine to 50,000 miles, we finally swapped them out on the customers bike due to noise.

Most people change dry clutches due to noise or the groan, you can fix the groan for another 5-6000 miles by maintaining the plates but noise will continue to get louder. The 50,000 mile plate that is 1/2 worn is still well within fiber thickness spec so friction material has not worn appreciably in that amount of miles. Another option is a slipper clutch, these will wear out the fiber materials much faster and give you a reason to change plates more often. A down side to the slipper is they often do not like to slip pulling away so expect the groan to come sooner, this is the reason I do not recommend dry slippers for the street.
 

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Agree Ive never seen a friction disc wear out of friction material, wear is about hammering.
Some rumours were floating around that a slipper clutch may do that, it is false information, same wear is the culprit as on normal clutches, hammering ;)
To orginal poster, it was a joke about WOT, think you got that.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Maybe I like the noise but functionally those can be made to work just fine. If you want a quiet clutch I agree that you need to change basket and plates if you simply want to make the clutch function as normal (except noise) then try this first.

1. remove the clutch pack and surface all steel plates, you need all those dots you see removed and the plates flat again. The dots are the curled bits of metal from the fiber plates that have broken off and fallen in between the plates. This causes the groaning noise as you pull away as it is high spots that are not wanting to slip as you are trying to slip the clutch pulling away. Remove the high spots and you remove the noise.

2. The tabs on the fiber plates will continue to fall in if you do not clean them up so take a grinder,file etc and remove all curled up metal on the plates. Try to keep all plates as uniform as you can and remove as little material as possible. Know that the larger the plate to basket gap the faster the wear so expect to do this operation more often as the parts wear. Once you get close to 1/2 plate tab thickness I would toss them. I have a plate on the wall that was about 1/2 worn (tab) and worked fine to 50,000 miles, we finally swapped them out on the customers bike due to noise.

Most people change dry clutches due to noise or the groan, you can fix the groan for another 5-6000 miles by maintaining the plates but noise will continue to get louder. The 50,000 mile plate that is 1/2 worn is still well within fiber thickness spec so friction material has not worn appreciably in that amount of miles. Another option is a slipper clutch, these will wear out the fiber materials much faster and give you a reason to change plates more often. A down side to the slipper is they often do not like to slip pulling away so expect the groan to come sooner, this is the reason I do not recommend dry slippers for the street.
Very interesting. I may give that a try. I much prefer to refurbish things than replace whenever possible. It will be a little while but once I get around to pulling the disks for a closer look I will post them up for more guidance.

Agree Ive never seen a friction disc wear out of friction material, wear is about hammering.
Some rumours were floating around that a slipper clutch may do that, it is false information, same wear is the culprit as on normal clutches, hammering ;)
To orginal poster, it was a joke about WOT, think you got that.
No worries. I got it. >:)
 

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i'd just grind the peened out bits off, beadblast all the plates, wipe the frictions with lithium grease and refit it. if the friction material is fine it's not worn out.

looks like lots of throttle wheelies, not a lot of engine braking.
 

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TomTom said he was kidding but there was some wisdom to his joke. Most wear does come from hammering of the plates on the basket and where most of that comes from is on/off throttle conditions. so yes we like acceleration and decelerations but that is what wears them out faster than loading to one side or the other. I see far less wear on track bikes than street bikes , city bikes in particular. The up and down through the gears is less an issue than rolling off and on in the same gear.

A couple decades ago a vintage single racer told us his trick was to throw the steels on the concrete in his basement and grind it around on each side under his boot. He claimed it made the bike much easier to launch on race starts, we all laughed at him and assumed he was breathing too much race gas. In hind sight it is not as good as a proper surfacing job but will likely give a benefit. If you chose to try that method be sure to make a video.

Better yet .....
video tape yourself grinding the steels under your boots on the floor, best done while sipping wine with Pavarotti playing in the background.
File/grind the clutch tabs square and clear of burrs.
then show yourself coating your dry clutch fiber plates with lithium grease.
Title it "Ducati dry clutch maintenance"

If it works you will be a youtube god!
 

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I hope you’re good at picking the fly shit from the pepper.
 

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They’re not that trashed ,, seen worse.
Clean them up ..
Coat of grease ..
Quiet clutch mod ..
Keep riding it !
 

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Discussion Starter #12
so i also have an issue with my clutch master cylinder leaking. i did realize its condition until yesterday. the outer boot is completely wrecked. and it appears brembo no longer makes rebuild kits for these. i have checked with a few places already and they no longer have it. what cross over is there from other models clutch masters that i can i put on my 996 without dropping the coin on an entire new clutch master? i fear buying a used 996 MC will land me in the same spot i am now before too long.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I saw that and was thinking of getting it from motowheels because I have some gift certificate there. It is more than I would like to spend but it may be what I have to get. I also wasn’t sure it would work since it’s 13mm. Mine is stamped 12 mm. Now I am wondering if mine is original or the PO didn’t replace it. I know it was dropped on the left side at some point. Even though he told me it had never been down. But all that is another long story for a different time.

Attached is the numbering on my master.
 

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the smaller master will give a softer lever pull, but will need more lever travel. find the usa brembo seller and they should have both. yoyodyne had a great range, but i don't know if they do it anymore.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
the smaller master will give a softer lever pull, but will need more lever travel. find the usa brembo seller and they should have both. yoyodyne had a great range, but i don't know if they do it anymore.
Yeah I may reach out to them. I only cruise around and at times in a lot of stop and go. Couple that with my hand problems, I want to get the easiest pull I can on the lever. The slave is an upgrade at some pint as well but not until issues are fixed first. Thanks for the help.
 

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if you go small master and big slave you may reach the point where the lever travel is excessive. it's a compromise.
 

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Yeah I may reach out to them. I only cruise around and at times in a lot of stop and go. Couple that with my hand problems, I want to get the easiest pull I can on the lever. The slave is an upgrade at some pint as well but not until issues are fixed first. Thanks for the help.
You could also leave out two of the six springs in the clutch pressure plate;
makes a 30% less effort needed!

Cheers. Peter
 

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i don't think that would work on a 996 without slipping.
Well, my 996SPS runs like a champ and there is no slipping whatsoever!
Have been doing the lithium trick for the last 8 years now with 4 springs mounted
and i just love my clutch; it's very light and works flawless......;
just saying.
Have a good one!
Peter
 
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