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I avoided this thread for a while so that when I finally had a look, I could watch every episode in one sitting. Please place me in touch with the rest of the story.
 

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This has to go down as the most riveting thread on the forum.
Actually does anyone know we nominate a forum thread for a Pulitzer? :unsure:

Writing this all so far really brought back so many things I had not thought about in some time. And when I read it all it’s sounds like such a crazy story.

However, and matt would most likely agree with this, if anything we are underplaying how crazy the whole thing was.

It really was epic.
 

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Writing this all so far really brought back so many things I had not thought about in some time. And when I read it all it’s sounds like such a crazy story.

However, and matt would most likely agree with this, if anything we are underplaying how crazy the whole thing was.

It really was epic.
It does sound like a camp fire story but the way you two gents have put your thoughts into words have made it so entertaining. Keep it going please? I'm waiting for my fix of the day...
 

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Matt
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Discussion Starter #86
"You can push and I will hold the bike," Marty said. Moments prior to this Marty had leapt onto the 7 mile bike with all the joy of a young child climbing onto Santa's lap. At this point the bikes had sat motionless for nearly 20 years, the tires as flat as could be and each having taken a contorted set where the rubber was compressed between the wheel and the barren, dusty concrete floor of the storage unit. After a few speechless moments I asked Marty to please get himself off the bike as the bike isn't going anywhere with him sitting on it. He lept back off the bike with the same amount of enthusiasm that got him there in the first place. Normally when I venture out to pick-up a bike that I know has been sitting I bring my air tank so that I can inflate the tires, but this was the one detail that I forgot and I paid dearly for this oversight. The 7 mile bike was at least pointed in the right direction and I used some scrap pieces of 2x6 that I had in the trailer to deal with the drop from the storage unit floor to the paved exterior. Marty was so worried about this transition out of the storage unit that he nearly knocked the bike over trying to push the bike upright whereas I wanted the bike leaning towards me, not away from me. It felt like an arm wrestling match as he pushed the bike away from me and I was desperately pulling back with equal force. A few occasional glimpses of Greg told me that he was still very much enjoying the show. I couldn't be mad at him as there was no way I could possibly behave differently if I was him. Now it was time to push the bike, flat tires and all, the 100 or so meters to my trailer. Imagine pushing a bike with properly inflated tires, but up the steepest mountain road you've ever seen. That's how it felt. And before I began I gave Marty a task to distract him saying "Can you bring along the set of race tires?" Marty scurried out of our way and back into the storage unit and at the same time Greg and I began the world’s most challenging 100 meter dash.

I entered this enchanted forest thinking that Marty was an experienced motorcycle rider. The story I had heard through Ryan was that he had an SPS with miles on it (6,000 miles as it turned out) and that he bought a second one (the 7 mile bike) as part of his aspiring race effort. In addition he had purchased a new set of Michelin slicks, a chrome (now rusty) rear stand and some cheap ratcheting tie-downs, the latter of which were in the red duffle bag. That's as far as his race preparations ever got before defaulting on the loan in spectacular fashion and going underground with the bikes. And then I learned from Marty himself that he bought the 6,000 mile bike used with those miles already on it. Turns out Marty had never rode a motorcycle before; never. And I just witnessed the second time he had probably ever even sat on one.

So now it's time to retrieve the second SPS. On the upside is that Marty is now trained on how to stay out of the way. On the downside is that this bike is pointed into the storage unit and on top of that I'm exhausted from pushing the first one. And here we go again. Marty asks, "Should I get on it?" Greg should have paid a significantly higher price for his admission as he was getting even more out of this day than he expected. "No Marty, you should not," I said. "Oh, ok," he replied. Greg and I carefully backed the bike out of the storage unit while at the same time we somehow kept Marty at a safe distance. While Marty struggled with taking direction about what "not" to do, he was actually quite good with taking direction about what "to" do. "Hey Marty, why don't you grab that duffle bag and bring it along," I said. Once again he scurries back into the storage unit and out of our way. What a relief.

Marty started to ask, "Do you want to see the third bi..." I quickly cut him off, "No, I do not." I had already seen that it was a base model 916-era bike of some kind and at this point I had the wherewithal to know that I probably didn't want my fingerprints on that bike. "I bet Greg wants to see it," I said only to myself. It was tempting to volley that statement over the net at Greg, but I couldn't bring myself to do it.

The bikes are now out into the light of the day for the first time in two decades, this was a big milestone. And actually they are looking pretty good. Despite being dusty it's clear that both bikes are really great examples. The 7 mile SPS was exactly as it was the day it was built, even the silver warning decal remained on the tank. I added some soft ties to the bikes and was now ready to load them into the trailer, but I was interrupted by Marty who now seemed suddenly anxious and downright frantic. He began muttering "How do I know the money is real?" over and over again. My best guess was that all of Marty's transactions to date were cash-based. It left me really wondering what kind of incompetent person would approve this guy for a loan in the first place. Then Marty tells me that I cannot load the bikes. We had made it 99 meters and the last meter was absolutely going to be the most exhausting one.
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You guys are some of the luckiest SOBs known to mankind lol...stumbling upon this find the way you did. Super cool 👍🏼
 

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Not hard to imagine them sitting alone in that locker another twenty years, succumbing to the gods of corrosion. Or, even worse, one of those storage-war type characters.
Absolutely fantastic save! I hope you'll find some time to post them in action!
 

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1998 is when the graphics changed. Here is an unridden 1998 916 SPS. View attachment 984703
When Ducati deleted the beautiful graphics in 1998 the result was boring. The graphics on my 1995 916 was one element that drew me to the bike. The one time I took it to the track I bought a rashed set of fairings and installed frame sliders as well, there was no way I was going to chance rashing the original fairings. Besides, I don't think I would have had a lot of fun on the bike out of fear of dropping it, so it would have been a waste of time. That said, with the used fairings and sliders, I let it rip on the track and low-sided later in the day, the bike went down on it's left side and I went rolling on the tarmac in the other direction. The bike spun on the frame slider and came to rest off the track. I thought for sure the tank or tail would be messed up, but the slider kept them clean, I was amazed. Beautiful SPS btw. I would keep it in a bubble as well.
 
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