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I really liked the Corbin seat, too, but it put my knees too high in relation to my hips and was uncomfortable to ride for longer period. A shame because I like being able to touch the ground.
 

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Discussion Starter #22
I really liked the Corbin seat, too, but it put my knees too high in relation to my hips and was uncomfortable to ride for longer period. A shame because I like being able to touch the ground.
I get it. I am a towering 5 foot 7 inches. When I sit on the bike my heels are about 1 (maybe 2) inches from the ground, but the balls of my feet are fairly well planted. The Corbin Gunfighter looks to be the trick, however as was pointed out by Member *ducvet the Gunfighter isn't very well suited for "doin' the monkey" in switchbacks (aka hanging off the side of the bike). The stock type seat is rounded off allowing for gymnastics. I'll allow myself to put some time on the stock seat before I throw any money at something different. $500 bucks (cost of a new Gunfighter) can go a long way towards perhaps more necessary items other than a fancy seat.

Baby steps. I mean, I've never even ridden one of these things yet!

One thing that I'm a bit concerned with is the riding position. I have a nerve injury on the right side of my neck (inoperable, and permanent) ... so I'm a wee bit pensive about the riding position. I've been looking into different handlebar options in the event the low clip-ons create a problem. It may end up that some sort of 7/8" above-the-triple-clamps configuration will be required. Which would create a domino effect of a number of consequential issues, longer hydraulic lines and throttle cables, longer control wiring, handlebar cutouts in the fairing and so on. That said I've been looking into alternatives in that arena to get ahead of the issue in the event I need to go with higher handlebars.

Again, one step at a time. Hopefully I won't need to spends the munnies on a new seat and a different handlebar configuration. I'd prefer to leave the bike as designed if'n I can get away with it!

Admittedly I have been aggressively looking into removing some weight without getting stupid about it by going with ~titanium everything~. Not that Ti parts are "stupid" ... I just feel that for a street bike with the limits these air cooled 900's have a lot of moolah spent on titanium zip ties (et al) isn't really needed. At least from my point of view. Some Ti parts may be used (rotor bolts/caliper bolts) on this bike in an effort to keep things from rusting and looking shitty as well as complimenting the use of lighter front brake rotors and so on. But again, that's "down the road" stuff.

Right now my focus is sourcing new fuel system hoses, battery hold-down rubber straps, new braided stainless hydraulic lines, and uprating the heavy current wiring.

Oh yea ... and getting learned-up on replacing the timing belts. It's intimidating, but that's because I've not studied up on it at all just yet. A few hours of research will probably reduce anxiety I have about doing that procedure. From what I've read so far it looks as though "Exact Fit" belts are what to buy. Motowheels has a fair price on those ($37.50 or so each with the military vet discount).

Being a combat related "complex PTSD" sufferer, I am very much looking forward to what is described by the following:

''The man hunched over his motorcycle can focus only on the present instant of his flight; he is caught in a fragment of time cut off from both the past and the future; he is wrenched from the continuity of time . . . in other words, he is in a state of ecstasy; in that state he is unaware of his age, his wife, his children, his worries, and so he has no fear, because the source of fear is in the future, and a person freed of the future has nothing to fear.''
-Milan Kundera

That's the stuffs!!!


:smile2:
 

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Being a combat related "complex PTSD" sufferer, I am very much looking forward to what is described by the following:

''The man hunched over his motorcycle can focus only on the present instant of his flight; he is caught in a fragment of time cut off from both the past and the future; he is wrenched from the continuity of time . . . in other words, he is in a state of ecstasy; in that state he is unaware of his age, his wife, his children, his worries, and so he has no fear, because the source of fear is in the future, and a person freed of the future has nothing to fear.''
-Milan Kundera

That's the stuffs!!!


:smile2:
That is a good quote and it's the way I ride as well. Nothing else matters on the bike but the bike and the ride. Also being 5' 7" with short legs myself I've never really been able to touch the ground on my bikes. You will get good at low speed maneuvering and low speed balance to avoid putting your feet down. You have to be careful of off camber stops too, I track stand my Multistrada at lights when I can't reach the ground.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
I got fairly good at low speed/parking lot stuff on a pair of Harleys I had (back before fire was discovered ... 1980s). The Sportster (black bike below) wasn't too awful as it "only" weighed about 550 pounds. It took a little bit to become comfortable on the FXRS (the not-black bike below) since it came in at 650 pounds with a wider seat with a 64 inch wheelbase.

Funny ... Harley calls the FXRS a "sport model". Geez! :surprise: I really (really!) disliked that bike. I should never have traded in the Sportster for it. Live and (hopefully) learn, right?


:laugh:

I really miss that black one. It was one of those bikes you could just ride the holy piss out of and always be within the bike's limits. 4 speed transmission meant sticking it in 3rd gear around town and just leaving it there. I'm hoping this 900SS/CR will be as much fun as that black Sportster was. Something tells me it will, and then some by a factor of 10 plus.

.... "sport model" .... what the hell, over? ....


:smile2:
 

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The problem with corbin is they weigh to much so I bought a stock seat off ebay for $50 and reworked the foam...now I sit on the bike with my butt not with my thighs like the stock seat. Comfort level is greatly improved and for 300+ miles days are no problem and " Doing The Monkey" is easy.
 

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Discussion Starter #26
The problem with corbin is they weigh to much so I bought a stock seat off ebay for $50 and reworked the foam...now I sit on the bike with my butt not with my thighs like the stock seat. Comfort level is greatly improved and for 300+ miles days are no problem and " Doing The Monkey" is easy.
Nicely done. Your approach makes sense to me. In fact, you've reminded me that here in Yuma there is a Mexican fella that works at an upholstery shop that has made custom motorcycle seats for me in the past. He does excellent work. (Geez, it's been a few years ... I hope he's still alive and working on bike seats!).

Thanks for the input!!!!

:smile2:
 

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I personally ride on Corbin saddles -yes they weigh a little more but all day comfort is more important for me on a street bike --I have well over 1 million miles on BMW's & Corbin saddles--that said I have not put one on my 91 900ss--(I do have one on my 91 907ie) -I dont plan at this time to use the 900ss for long distance touring -but if I did -it would have a Corbin saddle on it--But for touring the BMW is a far better and more comfortable bike--For me by the way serious touring is over 1000 miles a day, I did the Iron Butt Rally 3 times many years ago-early 90's--But now I'm old and dont plan to do that again lol
 

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Discussion Starter #28
I personally ride on Corbin saddles -yes they weigh a little more but all day comfort is more important for me on a street bike --I have well over 1 million miles on BMW's & Corbin saddles--that said I have not put one on my 91 900ss--(I do have one on my 91 907ie) -I dont plan at this time to use the 900ss for long distance touring -but if I did -it would have a Corbin saddle on it--But for touring the BMW is a far better and more comfortable bike--For me by the way serious touring is over 1000 miles a day, I did the Iron Butt Rally 3 times many years ago-early 90's--But now I'm old and dont plan to do that again lol
Holy Radioactive Coyotes, Batman! A thousand miles per day? Way out of my league, that's for certain!

I'm thinking that having two seats might be a good idea. One for playing around or in-town riding to the VA clinic, another for long, purpose driven trips. But that will have to wait. While I am not saying the Corbin isn't worth the $500 bucks they get for it, I need to focus on getting this bike roadworthy first and foremost. $500 bucks goes a long way towards that end.

Like many things, I will probably change my mind about some of the various ideas I have percolating up there in my brain noggin at present. What seems ~good~ now will probably seem like nonsense after I put a few hundred miles on the bike. But that's totally ok. I'm learning as I dig into some of these ideas ... and that's a good thing!

Thanks for your input, Member *rennsportmotorrad .... good stuff!

:smile2:
 

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Here is a better photo of the seat modification. I have spent to much money lightning my CR to add weight she sits at 385 lbs. WET :)



rennsportmotorrad I agree about the tourning distance too. but I am talking about 300+ miles of sport riding with avg speed will in the upper 70 mph range.
I have done the Ironbutt once on 1150 GS in the mid 90's in preparation for an Arctic Circle trip...no big deal on the 1000 miles .
Now that Arctic/ Prudhoe Bay was a trip 6 weeks 11,800 miles and only stayed in a hotel once..three of us GS and 26 year old on KLR650!


I reagulary ride 100 + miles round trip just to breakfast on the weekends
 

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I've had a couple 900's, including a '95 900SS/CR. A few comments...

Those "mufflers" are too small to be very effective. I love how those bikes sound with more era correct Termi or FbF style mufflers - larger diameter and longer, stuffed with fiberglass mat. The 'glass takes out the high frequencies and gives them a nice rumble. The pipes shown will just be f'ing loud. I'm not a fan of obnoxiously loud bikes. I know all the cool kids are putting miniature SC Project mufflers on their bikes these days but they sound like shit. Loud does not equal good. FWIW I developed OEM auto exhausts for years so am admittedly a bit biased on this. My 900ss/sp was the best sounding bike I've ever owned, including a couple Ducati Superbikes.

Open intake - if you mentioned anything about this, I missed it. But, a popular mod was to remove/cut the airbox lid for better breathing. I reversed this mod on a couple bikes because it was also way too loud. Tucked in with chin on tank, and at around 4000rpm I thought my helmet was going to explode from the noise. Yuck. Some people like the mod, I hate it entirely because of the noise. Literally painful to me but some people like it.

Front end - I didn't notice any mention of this either but if you're throwing money around, put decent forks on it. The front ends on those bikes are harsh as hell. The frames are also known to crack around the headstock. I'm not at all convinced the two aren't related. Again people will disagree, but the forks on a '96 CR suck. Save the money on a Corbin seat and upgrade the suspension instead. I had a Corbin for my 907 and a Sargent on one of my 900s. Wasn't too impressed with either one. Oh yeah, I've got a Corbin for my 851 also but it doesn't fit... not sure why, it's used so who knows. Also had a Sargent on my Hypermotard, didn't fit for shit without mods. Anyway, aftermarket seats are hit and miss with people. I'd upgrade the suspension before the seat.

Larger battery cables are a great idea. Dial in the carbs, upgrade the cables, that thing will start instantly when you press the button. Seriously, people commented on how fast mine started. No whirwhirBoom... press the button and it's running. I ran AGV batteries too which probably didn't hurt. Be careful disconnecting the lead on the starter. If you spin the post you'll have to rebuild the starter motor... which may not be a bad idea anyway.

If you're into losing weight, a lithium battery will likely attract your attention. Fair enough, I'm running one on my 851. However... if you take the plunge, add a mosfet regulator and a voltage meter too. Trust me, just do it. And buy a battery that has built in battery management, like an EarthX. Don't buy the battery now thikning you'll add the rest later. My 851 now has a new ECU, a new lithium battery, a few other electronic bits, and a few scars compliments of a regulator dying and a battery melting down.

The lower profile front tire that the CRs used sucks IMHO. I put the same tire as an SP on my CR. It will hit the stock fender, but it's an easy fix that doesn't cost a dime. Install the front wheel, put something between the fender and tire where it rubs to hold them apart. Watch where the fender flexes when you do this. Shove the rag or whatever in place, then blow on the area of the fender that flexed with a hairdrier set on "high". It should get too hot to touch but not melting. Do that on each side where it flexed then let it cool. When you pull the rag the fender will hold it's new shape and not rub. I think you said something about how the low profile tire looks but get over that, make the bike work well. It'll still look cool.

Clutch slave cylinder... If yours doesn't leak now it will eventually. Aftermarket units are typically a larger diameter for an easier pull. I never thought that was needed until I put one on my 851. Look into it.

Clutch covers - open covers are popular but remember it's what protects the clutch if the bike falls over. I prefer beefier covers with holes over the minimal covers that show off the clutch itself.

The stock mirrors droop. Bar end mirrors aren't a bad idea though I never used them on those.

The gearing has likely already been changed from stock. If not, 15/41 is popular. One thing that often gets overlooked on those bikes is the plate the holds the countershaft sprocket in place. They wear out. If the teeth on it aren't the same thickness as the rest of the plate, replace it. On the last 900 I bought, that plate was worn at least half way through.

That's about it from what I remember... The SS's are fun bikes but usually take some TLC to make up for past owner's sins. Enjoy!
 

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Discussion Starter #31
I've had a couple 900's, including a '95 900SS/CR. A few comments...

Those "mufflers" are too small to be very effective. I love how those bikes sound with more era correct Termi or FbF style mufflers - larger diameter and longer, stuffed with fiberglass mat. The 'glass takes out the high frequencies and gives them a nice rumble. The pipes shown will just be f'ing loud. I'm not a fan of obnoxiously loud bikes. I know all the cool kids are putting miniature SC Project mufflers on their bikes these days but they sound like shit. Loud does not equal good. FWIW I developed OEM auto exhausts for years so am admittedly a bit biased on this. My 900ss/sp was the best sounding bike I've ever owned, including a couple Ducati Superbikes.
Noted. If it's a mistake to use the GPR Deeptone rig, then it's my mistake to make, and I'll own it. This is Harley country. There are plenty of straight "drag pipes" out here. My first Harley had the cores of the less than effective mufflers drilled out. Again, if the GPRs are wrong, I'll make changes. Attached is a pic of my first Harley (1984 XLX61 1000cc Sportster). Thanks for your suggestion.

Open intake - if you mentioned anything about this, I missed it.
That's because I didn't mention it. I didn't mention it because I've no intention of doing it.

Front end - I didn't notice any mention of this either but if you're throwing money around, put decent forks on it.
I'm not throwing money around. I'm a disabled military vet on a tight income. We had to dip into our savings just to buy this bike. I would never have even bought it had it not been for my wife and my doctors encouraging me to "get back on the bike". There are many (many!) riding vets here, many of whom are like myself, PTSD sufferers that deal with nightly horrid nightmares involving combat. Motorcycling is "the temporary cure" for most of us. Perhaps my enthusiasm has presented the wrong impression, but I'm not throwing money around. I've already been looking at various sets of Showa front ends on eBay (most run roughly $250 shipped). There are several shops the do excellent work on such front suspension systems, Race Tech being one. I have a number of motorcycle engines/frames/parts that will be sold to finance some of the uprates and changes on this bike. It comes down to "one step at a time".

Plus this ..... "You dont stop riding because you get old, you get old because you stop riding."

I've been a "shut in" for nearly five years, rarely even leaving the house at all. This motorcycle is probably the best therapy I've ever engaged in. The amount of encouragement I've rec'd from my family, my VA docs, and my fellow vets to "get back on the bike" has been manna from Heaven all by itself, let alone the brighter view of my future the bike itself brings.

... Save the money on a Corbin seat and upgrade the suspension instead. .... I'd upgrade the suspension before the seat.
I've already said in previous postings that I intend to get the bike right and blow off any new seats. If anything I'll go with modifying the stock seat as has been depicted by Member *califblue. It makes a shatload of sense to me.

... Larger battery cables are a great idea. Dial in the carbs, upgrade the cables, that thing will start instantly when you press the button. Seriously, people commented on how fast mine started. No whirwhirBoom... press the button and it's running. I ran AGV batteries too which probably didn't hurt. Be careful disconnecting the lead on the starter. If you spin the post you'll have to rebuild the starter motor... which may not be a bad idea anyway.
Check. I've worked on (quite literally) roughly a thousand starters and starter solenoids when I owned and operated my industrial equipment factory authorized repair and warranty center for fifteen years. Many of which have that same problem on the hot stud, even worse is the fact that many of the hot studs on those starters and starter solenoids are made of plated copper. When the nut that secures the cable to the positive in stud loosens over time, and arcing occurs, it really screws up the threads on the stud(s) and makes for replacing the starter and/or solenoid. So thanks, I'll take care.

If you're into losing weight, a lithium battery will likely attract your attention. Fair enough, I'm running one on my 851. However... if you take the plunge, add a mosfet regulator and a voltage meter too. Trust me, just do it. And buy a battery that has built in battery management, like an EarthX. Don't buy the battery now thikning you'll add the rest later. My 851 now has a new ECU, a new lithium battery, a few other electronic bits, and a few scars compliments of a regulator dying and a battery melting down.
Good advice, thank you. I've been into the idea of using a LION batt for quite a while back when I was building a certain bike that didn't get finished due to the lack of available engine parts.

The lower profile front tire that the CRs used sucks IMHO. I put the same tire as an SP on my CR. It will hit the stock fender, but it's an easy fix that doesn't cost a dime. Install the front wheel, put something between the fender and tire where it rubs to hold them apart. Watch where the fender flexes when you do this. Shove the rag or whatever in place, then blow on the area of the fender that flexed with a hairdrier set on "high". It should get too hot to touch but not melting. Do that on each side where it flexed then let it cool. When you pull the rag the fender will hold it's new shape and not rub. I think you said something about how the low profile tire looks but get over that, make the bike work well. It'll still look cool.
The smaller front tire is a nod to the sport bikes of the 1980s that used a 16" front wheel and an 18" rear wheel. It makes the bike handle better at lower speeds (more responsive). My comments about "the look" are about how it reminds me of those bikes and how they were a "trick" used that made those bikes out turn bikes with a 19 inch front wheel. Keep in mind that a lot of what I say is motivated by raw enthusiasm. Thanks for the input on this.

Clutch slave cylinder... If yours doesn't leak now it will eventually. Aftermarket units are typically a larger diameter for an easier pull. I never thought that was needed until I put one on my 851. Look into it.
I already have an Oberon clutch slave in my "shopping cart" at Motowheels.

LINK = https://motowheels.com/i-7189544-oberon-clutch-slave-cylinder-ducati-fits-models-listed.html

Clutch covers - open covers are popular but remember it's what protects the clutch if the bike falls over. I prefer beefier covers with holes over the minimal covers that show off the clutch itself.
I've no intention of using some open type clutch cover.

The stock mirrors droop. Bar end mirrors aren't a bad idea though I never used them on those.
My bike already has bar-end mirror (one). Look at the pics of it. I rarely ever use the mirrors, rather I check my blind spot by actually turning that thing on top of my shoulders (my head) to see what's up. Having ridden Harleys for a few years (the mirrors are 100% useless on them) I'm used to checking behind me by actually looking.

The gearing has likely already been changed from stock. If not, 15/41 is popular. One thing that often gets overlooked on those bikes is the plate the holds the countershaft sprocket in place. They wear out. If the teeth on it aren't the same thickness as the rest of the plate, replace it. On the last 900 I bought, that plate was worn at least half way through.
Noted. I'll give it a good look.

That's about it from what I remember... The SS's are fun bikes but usually take some TLC to make up for past owner's sins. Enjoy!
Will do. 10-4, 10-8.
 

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Discussion Starter #33
He's telling the truth... :crying::crying::crying:
That's a given with any used bike. There are legions of people that have more money than brains. I feel fortunate that the 900CR I bought is one that wasn't subjected to too much squidly dumassery. It could have been a whole lot worse, that's certain. A bit of neglect, sure. But again, that's a given with pretty much any used bike.

You pays yer munnies, you takes yer chances.
 

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Might want to keep the mirrors in your dream plans, riding position doesn't make it comfortable looking behind you as much as other bikes you've ridden and more so if you have a full face helmet.

And also, since you have been off the bikes for a while you may not yet appreciate the scourge that smart phones have become to bikers. Texting, watching porno's, whatever they are doing they are not looking at the road - especially at stoplights you gotta keep an eye behind all the time in traffic.

Fortunately Yuma is not a major metro area, so you can ease into it!
 

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Discussion Starter #36
SOME PARTS CAME IN (entry #1)

GPR Slip ons arrived. The "link pipes" had to be made up for my application. GPR no longer offers the Deeptone INOX slip ons for the 1996 900CR unless it's done via special order That said my order took a bit longer to arrive.

Beautifully done, best I can tell they're either laser welded or a process known as "Cold Wire TIG" was used to weld up the stingers (~ahem~ ... mufflers). Included were pre-installed "DB Killers" which are retained inside of the stingers using what I call a "*Jesus key" A nickname for internal snap rings, named for the hassle they can be to remove or install sometimes, making one yell out "JESUS!" while working to remove or install them.

The stingers came in these neat cloth black bags (one for each muffler) that use draw strings for closure. The mounting hardware also came in it's own draw string bag.

Also included is a very comprehensive installation manual. Not just some silly sheet of paper, but an actual manual.

The kitty in the pics is "CooCoo". She's daddy's girl, one of the feral cats we've taken in. She pretty much follows me everywhere, and she firmly believes she is a movie star, always stepping into the shot when I'm taking pictures.

The image of the yellow bike has the same type of "link pipes" that GPR made up for my order. I had actually ordered "S" shaped link high pipes, but I had also stipulated that I wanted the link pipes to clear my heels. I figure GPR knows best when it comes to those things. To be honest, after I had ordered them I had secretly hoped GPR would send the shorter link pipes, so I guess my wishes came true!

I'll be posting comparative weights between these GPRs, the Termis that my bike came with, and the stock "bazooka shooters" that also came with the bike in an upcoming project entry.





*That name ("Jesus key") was actually coined by the best friend I ever had, who took his own life in the year 2000 when he put a gun to his head and pulled the trigger. His younger brother committed suicide in 1979 by using a rifle that belonged to my friend while my friend was in the Navy, and his father committed suicide when my friend was roughly 4 or 5 years old. His name is Bob. We knew each other from 7th grade (1973) in Tucson, up to the year 2000. I miss him every day. I only wish I knew he was in pain, and that I could have had the chance to save him from his demons. Deeply tragic family history.
 

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Discussion Starter #37
SOME PARTS CAME IN (entry #2)

The Anti Gravity ~LION~ battery came in. It's ridiculously lightweight. The stock box of lead and acid weighs 12 pounds 14 ounces. This Anti Gravity battery weighs 2 pounds 3 ounces. So roughly 10 pounds 11 ounces lighter than the lead acid lump. It came with really nice hardware for connecting the cables to it. I'll need to fab up some spacers so it will fit in the battery tray of the 1996 900CR. I'll install it after the carbs come back (they've been shipped out today, they should arrive in my hot little hands by the end of this week or the beginning of next week).

The battery came with a little bonus item. It's some sort of LION powered lamp, that has a number of configurations and uses. Best I can tell it also may be switched on and off via Blue Tooth (somehow?). It's bright as the Sun, and recharged via USB-C connector (cable included!).


Work on the bike will resume in about a week. Once the carbs show up I can get started with that. I've ordered in a set of heavy duty battery cables, a case saver, and a set of Exact Fit belts from Motowheels.

Carbs, battery, and heavy duty cables first.
Then I'll make sure it starts and runs.

Once happy with that, the case saver goes in.
Then the swingarm adjuster plates (see previous posting).
Lastly the GPR slip ons will be installed.

So, plenty of work ahead. One thing at a time!

:smile2:
 

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"*Jesus key" A nickname for internal snap rings, named for the hassle they can be to remove or install sometimes, making one yell out "JESUS!" while working to remove or install them.
Way back in the '80s when I was an apprentice mechanic I worked for a civilian employee who'd been a P-51 mechanic in WWII. He owned his own John Deere dealership and worked at the air base for fun.

He was the first guy to tell me about "Jesus" clips. In his version of events, they (the snap rings) earned the name "Jesus" clips in WWII because when a mechanic took one off, it would go flying off into oblivion and the mechanic would holler "Jesus" where did it go????

Now imagine, working on a aircraft parking ramp built of PSP on a muddy field and trying to find a tiny snap ring that flung off onto the stuff pictured below.....only covered in mud.



My condolences to you on your friend. I didn't know him, so I can't say anything profound to you about what happened. I only know, that sometimes, there truly wasn't anything you could have done. Honor his memory, but don't beat yourself up over what you perceive you might have been able to do.....sean
 

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Discussion Starter #39 (Edited)
...Now imagine, working on a aircraft parking ramp built of PSP on a muddy field and trying to find a tiny snap ring that flung off onto the stuff pictured below.....only covered in mud.

:laugh: I have a long, deep, scar on my right shin that reminds me of that landing mat stuff. I was a squad leader on a nuclear weapons tactical response team (think of a heavily armed "SWAT" team that protected nukes). One night we were responding to a perimeter alarm at one of the eighteen Titan 2 ICBM silos that surrounded the City of Tucson. Usually those alarms were tripped by a rabbit or a coyote but you could never take that for granted so we were spread out, silently clearing the entire area. It was pitch black out that night, no Moon. I was quietly making my way through a sand wash, stopping ever three or four steps to assess, look, and listen ("ALL") when one of the M-60 machine gunners got my attention to say something to me. I was still silently creeping along on foot as I whispered to the M-60 gunner my response, my visual attention drawn to my left flank. I felt a sharp pain on my right shin, and started to trip over something, my reactions went into play and I did a forward ~flip~ landing flat on my ass on the other side of the mat. I had tripped over a length of landing mat that had somehow been caught up in a flash flood and was half buried in the sand, up on it's edge, those hooks being about 16 inches above the sand.

My shin had raked down that exposed edge of hooks, ripping the flesh, making the shinbone visible. It wasn't bleeding to terribly bad, I just removed the "do rag" that was wrapped around my head as a sweatband, and wrapped it around my shin. That damned thing HURT like the dickens. We completed our search (nothing found) and the twelve of us got back into our armored response vehicles (four men to each vehicle, making up three four man fire teams) and resumed patrol.

I took some paper towels, made a bandage, and wrapped it all up with black electrician's tape to get me through the remainder of our shift that night. I never did report it, or go to the infirmary to have it stitched up. Consequently a deep, long scar was left to remind me of the event. Every time I see landing mat I feel a little bit of a twinge on my right shin.

:laugh: ... our days of youth .... it's a wonder we survive them at all!!!






My condolences to you on your friend. I didn't know him, so I can't say anything profound to you about what happened. I only know, that sometimes, there truly wasn't anything you could have done. Honor his memory, but don't beat yourself up over what you perceive you might have been able to do.....sean
Thank you for the advise. It's good advise.

0:)

EDIT: Readers please note that there are two new progress posts that I put up yesterday ... scroll up past the yakkity yak if these two posts and you'll see the attached pics and text added regarding new parts that came in. Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #40
CARBS (part 1)

I sent the carburetors to Custom Carb Service, recommended to me by several forum members. I've no choice but to say they came out utterly fantastic. Turn around time was inside of four days between the day they arrived at Custom Carb Service and the day they were shipped back to me.

The first two images are ~before~ shots, taken the day I removed them from the motorcycle. The third image is one ~before~ and one ~after~. The remaining images depict the innards and assembled units after refurbishing.

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