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Discussion Starter #1
I was all ready to buy a 170/60 which is what the sticker on the bike said but then i went to the bridgestone site and they claim the 170 should have a max recomended rim size of 5 inches. the 180/55's have a recomended 5.5 rim size. so for my 99 900ss which is the better bet.

source "http://www.bridgestone.com/products/motorcycle_tires/products/battlax/s20.html"
 

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I was all ready to buy a 170/60 which is what the sticker on the bike said but then i went to the bridgestone site and they claim the 170 should have a max recomended rim size of 5 inches. the 180/55's have a recomended 5.5 rim size. so for my 99 900ss which is the better bet.

source "http://www.bridgestone.com/products/motorcycle_tires/products/battlax/s20.html"
The rule of thump is......
5.00" rim width - 170/60
5.50" rim width - 180/55
6.00" rim width - 190/50

If you have 5.00" rim width stay with the 170/60.
 

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I have 180 Michelin Road 3 on my rear and it's fine on my 2003 900SS. I believe I have the 5.5" rim and it's just fine. I know that some tires are actually wider than other tires. I have no problems at all with my tires and there isn't any loss of turn in "quickness." When you get into the 190 series, that's when I believe that things start to get shifty.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
The rule of thump is......
5.00" rim width - 170/60
5.50" rim width - 180/55
6.00" rim width - 190/50

If you have 5.00" rim width stay with the 170/60.
it's a 5.5" rim i'm pretty sure. the widest point is above 6 inches and i think since it's narrower on the inside it's 5.5inches
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I have 180 Michelin Road 3 on my rear and it's fine on my 2003 900SS. I believe I have the 5.5" rim and it's just fine. I know that some tires are actually wider than other tires. I have no problems at all with my tires and there isn't any loss of turn in "quickness." When you get into the 190 series, that's when I believe that things start to get shifty.
i used to have a gs500f that i put a 150 or 60 on from a a 130 and that i took a torch and a hammer to a brake bar to get it to fit and it still rubbed but i think i'll order the 180s then since i'm not ghetto rigging this bike at all
 

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I run a 180 on my 1992 900SS, no problems with clearance etc etc.
 

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I was all ready to buy a 170/60 which is what the sticker on the bike said but then i went to the bridgestone site and they claim the 170 should have a max recomended rim size of 5 inches. the 180/55's have a recomended 5.5 rim size. so for my 99 900ss which is the better bet.

source "http://www.bridgestone.com/products/motorcycle_tires/products/battlax/s20.html"
The 170 or 180 are good on a 5.5 rim for both the carb and injected supersport. The 180 can slow the steering on my '97 900ss but this depends on the profile. I once asked to have some new tyres installed during a service and at their recommendation they fitted a set of Bridgestone BT016 (180) tyres. I did enjoyed them but I soon noticed that the rear was rubbing on the chain, one of a long list of dumb ass things that mechanic did to my bike (have new mechanic now - Michael Berry's Desmo Clinic). Next was a set of Pirelli Diablo Rosso (170 rear) tyres and they were awesome. Currently have a set of Pirelli Rosso Corsa with a 180 rear and have to say that they are great once you get some heat into them. So to answer you, both the 170 and 180 are good. Just stick a quality tyre on and enjoy the ride. :yeah:
 

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Discussion Starter #9
The 170 or 180 are good on a 5.5 rim for both the carb and injected supersport. The 180 can slow the steering on my '97 900ss but this depends on the profile. I once asked to have some new tyres installed during a service and at their recommendation they fitted a set of Bridgestone BT016 (180) tyres. I did enjoyed them but I soon noticed that the rear was rubbing on the chain, one of a long list of dumb ass things that mechanic did to my bike (have new mechanic now - Michael Berry's Desmo Clinic). Next was a set of Pirelli Diablo Rosso (170 rear) tyres and they were awesome. Currently have a set of Pirelli Rosso Corsa with a 180 rear and have to say that they are great once you get some heat into them. So to answer you, both the 170 and 180 are good. Just stick a quality tyre on and enjoy the ride. :yeah:
Bought the 180's my last bike i had bt-016's on it and they were good and bridge stone came out with an updated s-20 so i'll try em out and see how it is
 

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All profile's are not the same!! I have a 99 900SS with a 180 rear no problems.
PPR Michelin 2CT !!
 

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I have a 99 900ss as well. It has a 5.5" rim and I am running a 180 Conti Motion. Seems fine, but then I'm not riding that hard.
 

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My 94 SS-SP has had 120 - 180 combo on it since it was new. I trashed the original crappy Michelin tires at the dealership. I have always run paired front/rear ie. same brand/same model.

Absolutely no handling issues. The SP had 5.5 inch wheels standard.

Bob
 

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Bigger Tires

The question might be – would you rather have more cornering grip along with a heavier turn-in and slightly lower top speed or have a quicker turn-in, less apex speed, but more speed on the straight? Getting the power and braking to the ground through the larger contact patch of a larger tire needs to be traded-off against the handling degradation experienced with a larger tire.

The size of the tire is selected by Ducati test riders during development testing of a new design. The manufacturer develops their chassis and suspension system components in combination with the tires in order to balance wear, traction, tread design, stability and handling design objectives. When you bought your bike, you paid for a lot of development and testing costs, so think carefully about what advice to take when making changes. It often will come down to individual riding styles and rider preference, so be critically honest about your own riding capabilities and needs compared to others.

Motorcycle tire sizes get larger from year-to-year so it's easy to think that bigger is better. However, chassis design development is the principal reason larger tires can be used to go fast, not the tire size by itself. So often it's best to stay with the recommended tire and rim size on a given model bike. When you modify your bike you often need to reconsider your tire needs. More horsepower generally means a larger tire is needed.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
The question might be – would you rather have more cornering grip along with a heavier turn-in and slightly lower top speed or have a quicker turn-in, less apex speed, but more speed on the straight? Getting the power and braking to the ground through the larger contact patch of a larger tire needs to be traded-off against the handling degradation experienced with a larger tire.

The size of the tire is selected by Ducati test riders during development testing of a new design. The manufacturer develops their chassis and suspension system components in combination with the tires in order to balance wear, traction, tread design, stability and handling design objectives. When you bought your bike, you paid for a lot of development and testing costs, so think carefully about what advice to take when making changes. It often will come down to individual riding styles and rider preference, so be critically honest about your own riding capabilities and needs compared to others.

Motorcycle tire sizes get larger from year-to-year so it's easy to think that bigger is better. However, chassis design development is the principal reason larger tires can be used to go fast, not the tire size by itself. So often it's best to stay with the recommended tire and rim size on a given model bike. When you modify your bike you often need to reconsider your tire needs. More horsepower generally means a larger tire is needed.
~isn't contact area more decided by the shape of the tire how hard the carcas is and the tire pressure?

But i have to think bridgestone engineers their tires to fit specific rims and by slapping a tire that's too small for a rim you'd end up with even worse handling characteristics then if you bought the tire ment for the rim. Not to mention the fact that the bike was built in 98 which means it was designed prior to that using the tire technology they had then, Tire technology has improved considerably over 14 years and i wouldn't be surprised to find that the shape has as well... If you stretch a tire on to a rim that's too wide you end up with issues when you're in lean. take for instance this extreme example when i was bored
 

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Im running a 170 on a 4.5" rim. I bought a replacement and went to a 160 per manufacturers recommendation.
 

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Hi

Just to add my tuppence worth, when I bought my 95 900ss it was running a 180 section rear on stock rim. The tyre was an Avon Storm and it was close on the hugger on the outer lip edge of the tyre but ran ok.

However when I came to replace with a new tyre (same make/model) I found it was rubbing big time. Removed the hugger to find that an arc had been formed inside the hugger! Obviously the old tyre had made an impression.

I wasn't about to chuck away the new tyre so ended up buying a carbon hugger which had better clearance and looks great too.

I guess different makes of tyre have different profiles; I probably would have been ok with a different brand..who knows.
 

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I'm pretty sure Ducati fitted 170s to the mid 90s SS models to save money. $10~15 x a few hundred thousand bikes = a few million $ saved.

Ask any tire rep ... 5.5" wheel gets a 180/55.

Ask anyone with years of actual experience in the industry (or racing)? It is probably safe to vary up/down by one size. So try them out and stick to what works best for you. You're the one riding the bike...

Me? My preference is Michelin brand and 180 size for 5.5" and 5.75" rear wheels.
 

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I think Ducati would love to be sellling a few hundred thousand bikes a year.

I'm not positive but don't think Ducati made a 5.0" wheel - at least for the Supersports. I think they were either 4.5 or 5.5.
I've got a 1999 SS900 with a 5.5 wheel that came with a 170.
Also have a 2006 SS1000 with a 5.5 wheel that came with a 180.
I believe the rolling diameters are similar as the 180 has a 55 section height and the 170 has a 60 section height.

I think either will fit and it's up to you. There are trade-offs as stated above.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
just an update as i havent been on much but after the track day the s20s held up very well, i was mainly going hard in the corners and not so much in the straights



no scary moments on the street or track with them yet

although they're probably wont be any more as i'm selling the bike
 

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just an update as i havent been on much but after the track day the s20s held up very well, i was mainly going hard in the corners and not so much in the straights



no scary moments on the street or track with them yet

although they're probably wont be any more as i'm selling the bike
What Track are you riding? Gingerman?
 
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