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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi everyone, I hope you’re all doing good.
I recently came across a 1299 SL at a great price, super low mileage (under 500) and got me very exited as it is the bike that I always dreamed of and I’m very keen to get it. I like the new V4 line up too but I’m really not sure whether I should go for the v4r or 1299SL.
(why not v4SL? too expensive)
Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated.
Thank you
 

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...got me very exited as it is the bike that I always dreamed of and I’m very keen to get it...
Above is you answer!

I don’t know anything about both bikes and my guess is that V4 is “better” on paper. But I doubt the “average Joe” will experience the difference.

Good luck!




Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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The R would be faster for most on track
But as fine a machine as the R undoubtedly is, imo it doesn't compare to the SL, either 1199 or 1299.
Those SL are two of the finest machines Ducati has ever produced, imo, and I would likely do terrible things to good people to get my hands on one!
If you can make it happen, I firmly believe the 1299 SL is a bike that would provide an unforgetable, unparalled riding and ownership experience
 

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Welcome to the forum, often these types of questions are asked and the poster does not give any idea of their experience, I normally ignore these posts, but today I feel like writing something.

I would say get the bike you like the most both are definately desireable, however carefully consider the following before spending your hard earned cash.

If you actually plan to ride either bike with any kind of regularity don't bother with either, these are extreme machines and they do not suffer traffic or surbubia lightly and neither do they like highways. Likewise if your previous experience is limited to Japanese machines, learner bikes and / or smaller capacity sport bikes reset your expectataions and even then you will likely be dissapointed (and also scared witless) by the riding experience.

Assuming you're still interested; I have complketed several hundred kilometers on a 1299SL and while I have not ridden a V4R I have however ridden a V4S some distance). Here in Australia the RRP for a 1299SL was almost double that for the V4R. That said most of the V4R's sold here are heavily optioned (exhaust, stands, cover etc) so the effective out the door price of the V4R is about 30% higher than its RRP.

The V4R is built to the Superbike regulations (which put a limit on the retail price) whereas the 1299SL was build to be simply the fastest Ducati V-twin for the street. What am I saying? if you can buy a 1299SL for V4R money, it sounds like a good buy and as a bonus the 1299SL is a more exotic machine.

Returning to earth... actually riding a 1299SL on the road will have you experience heat like you've never felt before (my legs have been blisterd), the cool carbon swingarm is wider (than the aluminium one fitted to regular models) so you can only use the tip of the left footpeg. The engine doesn't pull cleanly below about 3500rpm (so in town only first and second gears get used) and very low rotational inertia (carbon wheels and lighter flywheel) means the connection from the throttle to the rear wheel is direct, so you need to be very smooth when opening and closing the throttle if you don't want to experience jerky progress.

The V4 models include better heat management (it's still a warm ride though), however expect the V4R to be similarly snatchy at street speeds. The V4S I rode has an 1100cc engine (versus 1000cc for the V4R) and the variable length inlet provided excellent and smooth bottom end grunt which made it a much easier engine to live with than the 1299SL (hopefully this hasn't been lost on the V4R). The V4R sounds great with the street pipes, however the optional race pipes are often fitted and these are incredibly loud (and release a few more horsepower). The V4R also has a dry clutch which can be grabby and doesn't like traffic (long term Ducati owner love and hate these)

If they are so bad to ride why do we bother? These are 1% bikes (only good 1% of the time) and at that time there is nothing better - the faster and more serpentine the ride the better it gets. I have ridden a 1299SL at the track and in this environment all the road shortcommings melt away and become irrelevant and you see what she was really designed to do and make no mistake my smile stretched from ear hole to ear hole. Tthe same will be for the V4R.

Falling off a 1299SL does not bear consideration, so if its a track day toy, then the V4R is a better bet.

These bikes should be accompanied by at least on daily ride so the experience can be kept to the right conditions.

As I said at the beginning, buy the one you like but do it with open eyes. The world is littered with second hand limited edition machines that were bought by starry eyed individuals and soon sold by dissapointed and frightened owners that didn't realise how extreme the ride was going to be.

Andrew...
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Welcome to the forum, often these types of questions are asked and the poster does not give any idea of their experience, I normally ignore these posts, but today I feel like writing something.

I would say get the bike you like the most both are definately desireable, however carefully consider the following before spending your hard earned cash.

If you actually plan to ride either bike with any kind of regularity don't bother with either, these are extreme machines and they do not suffer traffic or surbubia lightly and neither do they like highways. Likewise if your previous experience is limited to Japanese machines, learner bikes and / or smaller capacity sport bikes reset your expectataions and even then you will likely be dissapointed (and also scared witless) by the riding experience.

Assuming you're still interested; I have complketed several hundred kilometers on a 1299SL and while I have not ridden a V4R I have however ridden a V4S some distance). Here in Australia the RRP for a 1299SL was almost double that for the V4R. That said most of the V4R's sold here are heavily optioned (exhaust, stands, cover etc) so the effective out the door price of the V4R is about 30% higher than its RRP.

The V4R is built to the Superbike regulations (which put a limit on the retail price) whereas the 1299SL was build to be simply the fastest Ducati V-twin for the street. What am I saying? if you can buy a 1299SL for V4R money, it sounds like a good buy and as a bonus the 1299SL is a more exotic machine.

Returning to earth... actually riding a 1299SL on the road will have you experience heat like you've never felt before (my legs have been blisterd), the cool carbon swingarm is wider (than the aluminium one fitted to regular models) so you can only use the tip of the left footpeg. The engine doesn't pull cleanly below about 3500rpm (so in town only first and second gears get used) and very low rotational inertia (carbon wheels and lighter flywheel) means the connection from the throttle to the rear wheel is direct, so you need to be very smooth when opening and closing the throttle if you don't want to experience jerky progress.

The V4 models include better heat management (it's still a warm ride though), however expect the V4R to be similarly snatchy at street speeds. The V4S I rode has an 1100cc engine (versus 1000cc for the V4R) and the variable length inlet provided excellent and smooth bottom end grunt which made it a much easier engine to live with than the 1299SL (hopefully this hasn't been lost on the V4R). The V4R sounds great with the street pipes, however the optional race pipes are often fitted and these are incredibly loud (and release a few more horsepower). The V4R also has a dry clutch which can be grabby and doesn't like traffic (long term Ducati owner love and hate these)

If they are so bad to ride why do we bother? These are 1% bikes (only good 1% of the time) and at that time there is nothing better - the faster and more serpentine the ride the better it gets. I have ridden a 1299SL at the track and in this environment all the road shortcommings melt away and become irrelevant and you see what she was really designed to do and make no mistake my smile stretched from ear hole to ear hole. Tthe same will be for the V4R.

Falling off a 1299SL does not bear consideration, so if its a track day toy, then the V4R is a better bet.

These bikes should be accompanied by at least on daily ride so the experience can be kept to the right conditions.

As I said at the beginning, buy the one you like but do it with open eyes. The world is littered with second hand limited edition machines that were bought by starry eyed individuals and soon sold by dissapointed and frightened owners that didn't realise how extreme the ride was going to be.

Andrew...
Hi Andrew, thanks so much for your reply.
I would certainly do more track riding with the SL
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Does anyone know of any insurance company that would actually insure the 1299 SL? Before getting the bike I got in contact with few companies and they all pretty much refused to insure the bike due to its high value.
(I’m from the US but currently living in london so any recommendations for insurance over here?)
Thank you!
 

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Does anyone know of any insurance company that would actually insure the 1299 SL? Before getting the bike I got in contact with few companies and they all pretty much refused to insure the bike due to its high value.
(I’m from the US but currently living in london so any recommendations for insurance over here?)
Thank you!
Insurance? What’s that? I live my my life on the edge and take responsibility for my own actions. If I were worried about wading up my bikes I wouldn’t ride them. If I didn’t have faith in my own ability I wouldn’t ride. Shit happens. Everyone seems so worried about the cost of having fun the it becomes to costly to have that fun. Buy the SL and ride the fucking thing like you stole it. 😃
 

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Does anyone know of any insurance company that would actually insure the 1299 SL? Before getting the bike I got in contact with few companies and they all pretty much refused to insure the bike due to its high value.
(I’m from the US but currently living in london so any recommendations for insurance over here?)
Thank you!
Have you tried BeMoto .... they get the best reviews from bikers that I know in the UK .... they sponsor the 44teeth channel on YouTube so seem to be a bit more into biking than your average insurance company.

 

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Discussion Starter #14
Have you tried BeMoto .... they get the best reviews from bikers that I know in the UK .... they sponsor the 44teeth channel on YouTube so seem to be a bit more into biking than your average insurance company.

hi Drum23- te banks for your reply.
I have indeed, they can’t insure the bike. I tried quite a few companies. Any other names?
thanks!
 

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Hi everyone, I hope you’re all doing good.
I recently came across a 1299 SL at a great price, super low mileage (under 500) and got me very exited as it is the bike that I always dreamed of and I’m very keen to get it. I like the new V4 line up too but I’m really not sure whether I should go for the v4r or 1299SL.
(why not v4SL? too expensive)
Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated.
Thank you
What are you using either of these bikes for?

If you are an expert racer with a sponsorship and a team either would be a good starting point for a race bike on an unlimited budget, but in that case you would already know which bike suits your team's goals.

If you are a collector you should get both. but the SL is going to be a bit more exclusive in the long run.

If you want to ride it to starbucks to show off to your buddies they most likely wouldn't know what they are looking at or the difference between the bikes - the V4 might be more impressive. But an S would probably have the same impact.

If you are buying a bike to ride in any meaningful way both are wrong. These are race bikes loaded with extremely expensive exotic parts that will not live long in a street environment. Service will be stupidly expensive and riding along at 30 or 40 MPH will be torturous to both you and the bike. Buy a Pani S to ride and the Super Leggera to put in your office.
 

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From what I have seen online Bike theft in London is an epidemic unlike anything
we have to deal with in the states now if it is truly as bad as they say it is I can see
why they wouldn't want to insure it.
 

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Insurance? What’s that? I live my my life on the edge and take responsibility for my own actions. If I were worried about wading up my bikes I wouldn’t ride them. If I didn’t have faith in my own ability I wouldn’t ride. Shit happens. Everyone seems so worried about the cost of having fun the it becomes to costly to have that fun. Buy the SL and ride the fucking thing like you stole it. 😃
Dude... not sure about NZ, but here in the states, a motor vehicle is not allowed on public roads without being insured. It's not so much about insuring the vehicle itself as it is about liability in the event of an accident. :cautious:
 

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Dude... not sure about NZ, but here in the states, a motor vehicle is not allowed on public roads without being insured. It's not so much about insuring the vehicle itself as it is about liability in the event of an accident. :cautious:
Morning Proph. New Zealand. Nice place. Thought about visiting there many times..…
 

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Morning Proph. New Zealand. Nice place. Thought about visiting there many times..…
But it's sooooo close to you.
 
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