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I have no idea how you guys live in these places... I do this: ... all Winter long, so that I NEVER have to see 123 fucking degrees on a thermometer.
Absolute insanity...
Same reason I don't complain about our doom and gloom winter weather up here in the Puget Sound Region of the PNW.
 

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I'll take excess heat now and then over gloom and snow and rain and a short riding season.
That's what AC is for.
Not that I want to move somewhere hotter than here such as AZ or NV.
Or the flat and hot plains states.
 

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Discussion Starter #23
I’m about to show my ignorance here ( yet again)
When my air conditioner was having trouble starting I bought a “ starter booster” capacitor
for it and the thing would kick on instantly. Would something like that help ?
It could. Those are also known as "hot start kits", they involve (usually) one or more large capacitors to provide a short boost of voltage to bring electric motors out of their start circuits as quickly as possible. Start circuits on electric motors are relatively "light duty" when compared with the "run" windings. Run windings are designed ro "run" the motor after it has spun up to proper operating RPM. There is a centrifugal switch that swaps windings from ~start~ to ~run~ once the motor hits spec'd RPM. The start windings drop out and the run windings drop in. The start windings are not designed to "run" the motor, and are not very hefty. Sooo ... those hot start kits can be helpful, since they give the motor a little more poop when spinning up to speed. Most electric motors already have "start capacitors" these days, and have had them for many years. Think of a bench grinder ... when you first turn it on you hear the motor spin up, then you hear a "click", and then the grinder motor seems to "settle" in at the spec'd RPM. That "click" you hear is the sound of the centrifugal switch dropping the start windings out and engaging the run windings.

This is what having enough generator is all about. There must be enough engine (aka torque) to provide current when electric motors are attempting to spin up to "run RPM" so that centrifugal switch can get the motor out of it's start circuit and off of those rather fragile start windings. If the gen is pulled down hard enough that the voltage goes down far enough ... electric motors that use a start winding and a run winding won't have enough power to get past the start winding, the motor will not reach "run RPM" and it will remain sortof stuck in it's start circuit ... which will cook it in fairly short order. You can tell when an electric power tool (or the like) has it's start circuit going to hell (or already dead) because when you pull the trigger the motor seems to take a long time to get up to speed (like a ceiling fan does). That slow spin up is an indication that the start circuit has taken a shit and the device is attempting to come up to speed using only the "run" windings, which takes much longer. In that condition that motor won't last much longer, since it's relying on the "run" windings to start it up and bring it up to spec RPM. It's like trying to leave the starting line in 6th gear (in fact that is an excellent analogy).

"Hot start kits" are usually additional capacitors (in addition to the regular start caps that are already on the motor). They can help ... but if you've got too little generator all the hot start kits in the world won't help. There comes a point in physics where not enough is just plain old not enough. Those hot start kits usually help things such as AC units that aren't designed well. Many AC units start the coolant compressor the moment the unit is powered up. That means it's drawing a lot of current to start the blower motor and the compressor motor, both under load while spinning up. Those hot start kits help that situation, since the AC unit is demanding a lot of juice just to get out of bed (so to speak) and get up and running. Sometimes hot start kits are installed as a band aid to cover up the fact that there's not enough current available (whether from too small of a generator or poorly done residential wiring schemes on grid power that usually have very poor neutral lines).

So that's why I said "they ~can~ help" ... it comes down to each situation I suppose.
 

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Discussion Starter #25 (Edited)
We bought a gennie a couple years ago after a half day with no power. Above 4000 watts running on gas, less on propane.
Figured we could at least run the fridge, a bedroom window AC and some lights. But the instructions say not to run it for more than a few minutes when temps are over 90 something, I forget the number. So far we have just exercised it, not had to run it "in anger".

Stay cool.
Now there ya go ... that's the right idea. A small gen powering a window unit to keep (maybe) just the bedroom cool, keep the fridge running so the food doesn't spoil, and run a few low wattage lights and a fan or two. Run it on propane and you'll not have to deal with soured carb or the gasoline in the tank going bad. You have to de-rate the gen a bit on propane since as a fuel propane doesn't produce as much power as gasoline (for example, a 4000 watt gen on gasoline is de-rated to 3600 watts on propane).

Even just a fan or two can get you through power outages in this desert heat. But keeping food stores edible by keeping the fridge powered is actually more important. The time we were out of power for a solid week in the middle of the worst heat/humidity our monsoons season offers, our nearby WalMart was giving out free ice every day (10 pounds per household, per day). The ice was to keep as much food safe as possible. WalMart has an emergency generator (at least around these parts they do), they were even allowing people to just sortof hang around in the store to get out of the heat. After nearly a full week the household running water stopped running, the water company's surplus tanks had run dry and there was no electricity to run the well pumps, and for whatever reasons the water company either had no back up gen or if they had one it wasn't operational. Good thing we have a 100 gallon water tank that we have filled by a local water supplier (reverse osmosis, etc..).

... the instructions say not to run it for more than a few minutes when temps are over 90 something ...
... this goes right back to what I was saying about "having enough engine" (which boils down to "having enough generator"). The little generators are often times marketed with little tricks. They'll call it a 4,000 watt, but what you don't know until you read the manual is that it will not produce that power at (what is called) "100% duty cycle" (100% power for 100% of the time). It will only put out that much power for (perhaps) six minutes out of every ten minutes of run time (aka 60% duty cycle rating). Said another way, for every six minutes of max output, it needs four minutes of cool-down time (while running) before it can provide another full power run. That's called "60% duty cycle". That means it can only run at 60% of it's full load capacity for 100% of the time.

In the end, ... "not enough generator".
 

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Discussion Starter #26
I have no idea how you guys live in these places... I do this:
View attachment 989425
... all Winter long, so that I NEVER have to see 123 fucking degrees on a thermometer.

Absolute insanity...
I like the heat .... it keeps many of the crappy people away ... most of them like their coastal weather instead. Although, Phoenix has become just another Los Angeles in many ways, including having more of the ~big city types~ from California moving to Phoenix area ... and bringing their messed up thinking right along with them. I reckon it won't be long before Phoenix is just another ~blue~ city, run into the ground by lousy leaders. Where I live most people would describe with a single word ... "sucks!". I do without a lot of big city conveniences, but at least we're not dealing with riots and destruction (for now).

Nobody likes this town, it's one of those love it or hate it places. And I am just fine with that. :)

My other favorite place has always been and hopefully always will be Tucson.

.
 

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Big cities are full of Citidiots...
I bought a Honda EM3000 Cycloconverter many years ago. And many extension cords. Seldom used and it doubles as a gasoline storage when not in use. It starts always 1st reason to buy a Honda. My Fag furnace has a pigtail I can rig up if needed in winter. I have a gas fireplace downstairs and my garage has a 5000 btu window AC and a ceiling mounted 60.000 fag furnace. So I should be able to keep comfortable in any situation. The Hondas never go on sale. I do run it every so often a few times a year and I siphon the stale gas out for the garden/lawn equipment.
I put a new Jeep AC compressor in last year to the tune of $1000. (Canadian$) in Wifey's Jeep, broken mounting studs upped the cost. I tried it last week out and no Cold air! Cripes why wasn't I informed?
So I bought the AC kit and topped it off with a can of refrigerant and 48° perfect! For now anyways...
When I worked "Inclement weather is no deterrence to getting the job done.
My worst day was doing a 48" Natural gas pipeline through a mushy swamp dragging welding cable. Soaked with sweat and electricity they don't mix.
Monkey butt .... corn starch...the good ole days
 

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Nobody likes this town, it's one of those love it or hate it places. And I am just fine with that. :)
It's not a "town" Rex... This is a town:
989552

Mystic CT, and there is not a soul alive who's visited who doesn't absolutely love it.
 

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*BTW, I played bocce at Mason's Island YC years ago,...

That hot spot in the middle of the year does make Tucson difficult for people to understand why we live here, but all the rest of the year it has awesome weather.

Mission San Xavier del Bac built in 1692, with snow on the Catalina Mountains in the background and the city in between down in the shallow valley where two rivers joined. The temperature downtown the day this photo was taken in January is probably about 70 degrees F, unusual cloudy sky kept it under 80F. You can smell the fresh powder snow on the pine trees everywhere in town on a day like this and once they plow the only road through the mountain you can ride your Ducati up to 9,000 feet.

Spanish priest Marcos de Niza came through here in 1539 along with Francisco Vásquez de Coronado, but the area was continuously occupied by the natives for 6,000 years or more. With the Gadsden Purchase in 1853, the site of San Xavier became a part of the United States and the new Territory of Arizona. Tucson was no longer a part of Mexico (Pimería Alta / Alta California) and became Arizona's first city incorporated in 1877 when silver was discovered in Tombstone just down the road. I live only a few blocks from where Wyatt Earp shot Frank Stilwell just a few days after he had escaped alive from the more famous OK Corral shootout.

Lot of interesting history around here and I live in a hundred year old house that was part of an older ranch surrounded by adobe walls to keep out the Apaches which were a serious problem until as late as 1924.

989557
 

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Mystic CT and there is not a soul alive who's visited who doesn't absolutely love it.
My brother lives in Greenwich... I am going to tell him to make the drive and check it out for some confirmation :D
 
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*BTW, I played bocce at Mason's Island YC years ago,...

That hot spot in the middle of the year does make Tucson difficult for people to understand why we live here, but all the rest of the year it has awesome weather.

Mission San Xavier del Bac built in 1692, with snow on the Catalina Mountains in the background and the city in between down in the shallow valley where two rivers joined. The temperature downtown the day this photo was taken in January is probably about 70 degrees F, unusual cloudy sky kept it under 80F. You can smell the fresh powder snow on the pine trees everywhere in town on a day like this and once they plow the only road through the mountain you can ride your Ducati up to 9,000 feet.

Spanish priest Marcos de Niza came through here in 1539 along with Francisco Vásquez de Coronado, but the area was continuously occupied by the natives for 6,000 years or more. With the Gadsden Purchase in 1853, the site of San Xavier became a part of the United States and the new Territory of Arizona. Tucson was no longer a part of Mexico (Pimería Alta / Alta California) and became Arizona's first city incorporated in 1877 when silver was discovered in Tombstone just down the road. I live only a few blocks from where Wyatt Earp shot Frank Stilwell just a few days after he had escaped alive from the more famous OK Corral shootout.

Lot of interesting history around here and I live in a hundred year old house that was part of an older ranch surrounded by adobe walls to keep out the Apaches which were a serious problem until as late as 1924.

View attachment 989557
Stunning... one of my son's lives in Boulder, which is also similarly blessed with gorgeous scenery.
 

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My brother lives in Greenwich... I am going to tell him to make the drive and check it out for some confirmation :D
If he likes to imbibe some really good microbrews have him look me up when he's here. I'll definitely pop out for a cold one...
 

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I lived in Boulder for several years, went to college one year there and attended two of the first three Great American Beer Festivals which started here. Still great beer in Boulder but I can't afford to live there. Was a rock climbing fool back then, crawled over every inch in this picture. My favorite spot was in the center of this pic in that gap halfway up on the right side where there is a circular natural amphitheater with awesome acoustics for guitar playing.

989560
 

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I lived in Boulder for several years, went to college one year there and attended two of the first three Great American Beer Festivals which started here. Still great beer in Boulder but I can't afford to live there. Was a rock climbing fool back then, crawled over every inch in this picture. My favorite spot was in the center of this pic in that gap halfway up on the right side where there is a circular natural amphitheater with awesome acoustics for guitar playing.

View attachment 989560
Ah the FlatIrons... simply stunning. Especially in snow and ice. I actually started off my climbing career on rock, and within a season had tried waterfall ice and that was that. I never donned climbing shoes or strapped on a chalk bag again.
989562
 

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I just like looking at pictures of ice and snow today, new A/C unit won't be installed until after the weekend.

989569
 

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Oof. That’s tough. Can you get to some elevation for relief?

Have a cool pic. Northern NH last winter.
3AF6BA91-58B9-4135-9F9B-881AC5F0C1B0.jpeg
 
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If you bought an AC unit with inverter technology you won't get anywhere near the inrush of amps required to get an old POS compressor working, saves a LOT on your power bill.
Now, drink your metamucil, take a crap and stop moaning
 

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Now there ya go ... that's the right idea. A small gen powering a window unit to keep (maybe) just the bedroom cool, keep the fridge running so the food doesn't spoil, and run a few low wattage lights and a fan or two. Run it on propane and you'll not have to deal with soured carb or the gasoline in the tank going bad. You have to de-rate the gen a bit on propane since as a fuel propane doesn't produce as much power as gasoline (for example, a 4000 watt gen on gasoline is de-rated to 3600 watts on propane).
So 4750 starting watts 3800 running on gas.
4275 and 3420 on propane.
I have only run it on propane, it has never had gas in the tank.
Pulled it out today to execise and battery dead even though it has been on a maint charger.
Oh well, starts with the pull cord and a battery is about $20ish.

Book says continuous operation is OK until 104F.
Don't see anything about duty cycle. I think it's just about not overheating it since the engine is air cooled.
I bought it as insurance, mostly for the fridge.
 
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