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Discussion Starter #1
So I have both of these and both are essentially new in that one has 4 miles (1098R Bayliss) on it and the other has 59 miles (Hayden) on them. I let them sit for many years, in a climate controller storage unit. What do I need to do to get these road worthy again? At this point I am afraid to try and turn either over for fear of damaging the engine. Neither have been serviced since I bought them, yes I know this is the worst thing I could have done but I wad deployed with nobody to take them in for service.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
With fuel. I got rid of the old gas.


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No. The worst you could have done is leave them outside, exposed to the elements.
Climate controlled, not so bad.
New tires, batteries, all fluids, thorough cleaning.
Make room for etc and etc.
Get em ready and go ride. You need gear. 0:)
 

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I'd open the fuel lines to the injectors, put some clean gas in the tank and turn the ignition on so the fuel pump runs to flush the fuel pump and lines out. Remove the tank, slosh the gas around in the tank and dump it out. Put fresh gas in the tank. You can either pull the injectors out and send them out to be cleaned or simply trying running the bike without cleaning the injectors and see how it runs and clean them if necessary.

Pull the plugs, fog the cylinders,put the bike in gear and turn the engine over by rotating the rear wheel. I'd probably do something like 10 revolutions of the rear wheel. You're trying to move everything gently trying to unstick things without doing damage. Put the plugs back in with a new battery and fresh gas and try to start it. Run it for a bit, shut it off and do all the fluids, and do the belts.
 

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I bought a low mileage 916 about 2 months ago that had sat in storage untouched for a few years.

This was stored with all the fluids as it was tracked one day, put in storage, and then for some reason never touched again until I bought it.

I am still finishing some things on it but this is what I have had to do so far, keep in mind the bike had less than 1800 miles on the clock, so everything that was needed was more or less due to time sitting.

The list so far:

First, all the fluids had to go.
Clutch: reservoir drained and cleaned, lines fully flushed and fluids replaced
Front and rear brakes: reservoirs drained and cleaned, lines fully flushed and fluids replaced. Pads were good and yours will be as well
Oil and filter drained and replaced. (If this is clumpy at all then do the oil change twice to ensure there is no sludge left. Suggest a cheap oil in the first change, put a few miles on it and dump it, then put in your higher end oil.)
Air filters had literally deteriorated over time, and all were removed and replaced
Fuel lines were like decomposing inside of the tank, this required me to replace all the fuel lines, the connections (went with metal quick connects) and the entire tank cleaned out. I lucked out here and there was no rust, just deteriorated lines.
Gaskets on the exhaust were like a composite fiber or something and looked broken down, so I swapped those out as well with metal ones.
New tires, they sadly looked brand new… but age had clearly caused hairline dry rot.
New belts
New battery
New sparkplugs
All the connections needed to be gone through and checked, bolts, screws, clasp, clamps etc. Replace whatever is worn, rusted, or noticeably aged.
Chain lubed and adjusted
Check suspension (mine needed no adjustment, and forks luckily weren’t leaking)

And finally cleaned and washed up.

I still want to replace hoses and a few other things but I’m up and running now.
Quite a bit of work for just sitting in storage.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Should I be worried about the tank on the 848 being swollen? I seem to remember this was an issue but I can't tell if this one is messed up. I am assuming the one on the 1098R is aluminum or some other alloy. I did notice that the decal on the upper fairing is bubbled on the 848.
 

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I did notice that the decal on the upper fairing is bubbled on the 848.
If the tank was full, the overflow under the cap can swell and cause fuel vapers to be released over time. As they build up it can cause gas to accumulate on the outside of the tank, this can slowly damage paint and decals.

If the decals are coming off it can very well be from fuel fumes.

Edit, sorry I just re-read and realized you said decals on fairings... I originally thought it said decals on the tank.. fairing decals probably would not be affect unless gas literally leaked onto them. It they are simply adhesive and not clear coated over it may have just been poorly laid to begin with and the adhesive broke down over time.
 

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Discussion Starter #9


The decal that is bubbling is just above the ‘848’ in this image. This is the upper fairing that holds the lights/dash assembly. The area is just below the frame tube on the opposite side (from image) of the fairing. I do not smell gas or see any damage on the tank itself.


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The decal that is bubbling is just above the ‘848’ in this image. This is the upper fairing that holds the lights/dash assembly. The area is just below the frame tube on the opposite side (from image) of the fairing. I do not smell gas or see any damage on the tank itself.


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Well hell, that bike is totaled how far do you live from DC I'll come pick it off your hands asap!

No but seriously, that is probably unrelated to the tank or fuel fumes... May just have happened over time to the adhesive.
 

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Tank swell is related to using gas with alcohol in it. Non-oxy gas only should be used or the tank should be left empty and dry. I don't believe any 1098R variant came with a non-plastic tank. I think the only non-plastic tank on the 1X98 series came on the 1198SP. Hope you stored the bikes with non-oxy fuel in them. If you didn't, the tank are probably swollen and will be difficult to reinstall after removal.

Fairing decals are not cleared over, so if they are damaged, it should be possible to remove the damaged decal and replace it. The tough thing is that decals typically age with sun exposure so you can end up with mismatched looking decals. Assuming your bike hasn't been exposed to sun while stored, you shouldn't have this problem.
 

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Ray is correct, std tank on the 1098R is plastic, you can buy a ducati performance alloy tank though, i'd recommend it they're larger and the R is thirsty when ridden in anger.

As for readying it for use you will need to remove the tank and disassemble, replacing the O ring that seals it, ALL lines and filter.
Likely need to change your air filter too.
Change your oil and filter
Change your belts!
Change your tyres
New Battery. I would upgrade the starter cables for big heavy duty ones while it's apart too.
Flush all brake fluid well, very well, then flush it again.
Change your coolant
Pull the plugs, fog the cylinders well before turning it over
Check wheel bearings and fork seals

Once you have done all of that, before you start it take the plugs out, turn it over on the starter until the oil light goes out, reinstall the plugs and you should be good to go.
Enjoy them both, but the R is a weapon!
 
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