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If I had done this in America with a full garage it would have been a different story. This was done in a public parking lot, in Osaka, between 11:30PM and 5:00AM out of a duffel bag. I think it's pretty good for what I had available. 馃槵

I want that Mosfet kit and may still order it eventually to replace this OEM voltage regulator. I cut the connectors off and hardwired everything, and I'm not sure I could get everything back to the connector now. There were multiple wires of the same color on the same connector, so I went very carefully one wire at a time over several hours. I soldered everything and tried to make the best connections I could so that nothing would burn or melt.
If you go with the Roadster Cycle mosfet ~kit~ all new connectors with short bare pigtails are included to allow you to wire the new VR in place. Here, take a look ... (scroll down to the "Complete MOSFET FH020AA Shindengen crimp or solder kit")

LINK = https://roadstercycle.com/

Good job considering your circumstances ... I've done jobs in all-night carwash stalls before ... years ago a friend of mine helped me install a complete 2" body lift on a Chevy pickup in a car wash stall one night!
 

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Discussion Starter #22
If you go with the Roadster Cycle mosfet ~kit~ all new connectors with short bare pigtails are included to allow you to wire the new VR in place. Here, take a look ... (scroll down to the "Complete MOSFET FH020AA Shindengen crimp or solder kit")

LINK = https://roadstercycle.com/

Good job considering your circumstances ... I've done jobs in all-night carwash stalls before ... years ago a friend of mine helped me install a complete 2" body lift on a Chevy pickup in a car wash stall one night!
Thanks, I may order that over the winter.
Let鈥檚 say I do install it, and I cross the yellow wires or something, what happens? Why are there multiple wires of the same color?

If I could match the new regulator to my current one it would be much easier, but I don鈥檛 know if anyone has drawn that up.
 

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Thanks, I may order that over the winter.
Let鈥檚 say I do install it, and I cross the yellow wires or something, what happens? Why are there multiple wires of the same color?

If I could match the new regulator to my current one it would be much easier, but I don鈥檛 know if anyone has drawn that up.
Give me a little bit of time ... I have that thread earmarked ... I'm having supper with my family right now. :)
 

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These two threads are very informative. Took me a while to dig them up, thank you for your patience. I hope the delay didn't inconvenience you.

LINK = https://www.ducati.ms/threads/the-upgrade-fix-no-more-charging-regulator-rectifier-problems.94947/

LINK = https://www.ducati.ms/threads/regulator-differences-for-lithium-battery.717127/

BELOW; These two diagrams are helpful as well. The first one depicts the Ducati single phase charging system, note that there are two wires coming from the stator. The second one depicts the Ducati three phase charging system, note that there are three wires coming from the stator. The number of stator wires is what you use to determine which charging system your bike has. If you end up doing searches on the matter within this forum, you may find that some people refer to the single phase system as a "two phase system", which is incorrect. Two wires means single phase, three wires means three phase. I only point that out to prevent you from becoming confused in the event you run across mention of a "two phase system" .... if so, disregard that description and know that it is actually a single phase system. "Two phase" power systems were used in the late 1800s and early 1900s and usually had four wires. Those systems have not been used in roughly 100 years. So just remember any reference you see about these motorcycles to "two phase" systems are actually single phase systems. Make a mental note of that.



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try cleaning/straightening the first couple of bolt hole threads with a dental pick then lube before starting a diff. clean bolt.if it threads clean the org. bolt threads as they may be the issue as well.tapping may destroy all the threads.
 

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There were multiple wires of the same color on the same connector, so I went very carefully one wire at a time over several hours. I soldered everything and tried to make the best connections I could so that nothing would burn or melt.
Yellow wires can be connected in what ever order. Also you should never solder wires in motorcycle or car. Because solder brakes when it vibrates. Use for example these kind of connectors:
 

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Thanks, I may order that over the winter.
Let鈥檚 say I do install it, and I cross the yellow wires or something, what happens? Why are there multiple wires of the same color?

If I could match the new regulator to my current one it would be much easier, but I don鈥檛 know if anyone has drawn that up.

It's really simple.
The Mosfet regulator has two sockets, one with three connections and the other with two.
The three group are the a/c phase input connections from the alternator and it makes no difference which yellow wire goes to which pin.
The two connector socket is the d/c output socket to the battery via the charging fuse.
The connector nearest to the three phase socket is always the red/positive output and the one furtherest away is the negative.
If you connect a single phase alternator (two yellow wires) just use any two of the three connections to the regulator.

975387
 

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Discussion Starter #29 (Edited)
It's really simple.
The Mosfet regulator has two sockets, one with three connections and the other with two.
The three group are the a/c phase input connections from the alternator and it makes no difference which yellow wire goes to which pin.
The two connector socket is the d/c output socket to the battery via the charging fuse.
The connector nearest to the three phase socket is always the red/positive output and the one furtherest away is the negative.
If you connect a single phase alternator (two yellow wires) just use any two of the three connections to the regulator.


So I can just pick a green wire or should I splice both together into the green on the Mosfet? Thanks a lot for typing this up for me.
 

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Discussion Starter #30
Yellow wires can be connected in what ever order. Also you should never solder wires in motorcycle or car. Because solder brakes when it vibrates. Use for example these kind of connectors:
I did not know this. I've used solder tons of times and never had one break loose yet. I guess if I put this mosfet in I'll give this a try. I just assumed solder was a more solid connection than those crimp connectors.
 

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The US Military as well as Marine Specifications are all about crimp connections rather than solder. If done properly crimp connections offer a good deal less resistance than soldered connections, as well as superior mechanical connections. The key being "if done correctly". I use nothing but crimp connections in custom modular synthesizer power distribution bus systems, as well as other custom hand made audio processors for guitar players, bass players, and vintage Hammond organ players.

I reckon if it's good enough for fighter jets, nuclear bombers, M1 tanks, aircraft carriers, and nuclear submarines, it's sho' nuff good enough for touring musicians that ship their precious synthesizers and audio processors all over the planet at the mercy of commercial airlines.

(Below) These are modular synthesizer power distribution bus systems. Hand made.

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So I can just pick a green wire or should I splice both together into the green on the Mosfet? Thanks a lot for typing this up for me.
The red is the positive output to the battery.
The green wire in the picture is the negative wire to the battery (or bike earth point.
Normally the negative wire will be black, the green is just on that bike of mine.

When a joint is soldered on a bike or car it's not uncommon for it to fracture where the solder ends as the soldering flux if not clinically cleaned off will continue to attack the wire over time and vibration does the rest.
I manufacture an electronic automotive product for a living these days and all external joints are crimped.
There is not one contemporary vehicle manufacturer that solders joints in cables. they are all crimped for the above reason .
 

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Discussion Starter #33
It's really simple.
The Mosfet regulator has two sockets, one with three connections and the other with two.
The three group are the a/c phase input connections from the alternator and it makes no difference which yellow wire goes to which pin.
The two connector socket is the d/c output socket to the battery via the charging fuse.
The connector nearest to the three phase socket is always the red/positive output and the one furtherest away is the negative.
If you connect a single phase alternator (two yellow wires) just use any two of the three connections to the regulator.

View attachment 975387
The red is the positive output to the battery.
The green wire in the picture is the negative wire to the battery (or bike earth point.
Normally the negative wire will be black, the green is just on that bike of mine.

When a joint is soldered on a bike or car it's not uncommon for it to fracture where the solder ends as the soldering flux if not clinically cleaned off will continue to attack the wire over time and vibration does the rest.
I manufacture an electronic automotive product for a living these days and all external joints are crimped.
There is not one contemporary vehicle manufacturer that solders joints in cables. they are all crimped for the above reason .
It won鈥檛 be hard to go back and re-do it. If I had known crimping was better I would have done that and saved a few hours of work... 馃槗. I did a lot of things wrong apparently, but at least I have a running bike now.
 

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It won鈥檛 be hard to go back and re-do it. If I had known crimping was better I would have done that and saved a few hours of work... 馃槗. I did a lot of things wrong apparently, but at least I have a running bike now.
I wouldn't say you did anything ~wrong~ ... more like there are better ways to do what you did. Keeping in mind you didn't really have a shop or a good place to really work on your bike, I'd say you did a pretty bang up job given the circumstances. Think of it this way ... look at how much you've learned while going through this process ... not just the work you did, but also sharing it with the membership. And you're right ... at least you're riding!!!! Some folks are so focused on perfection (who .. me?) that they never get anything done and a week long project ends up being six months long (who ... me?).

Keep on truckin' bruthuh .... (y)
 

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On cars and especially bikes, where the electrical are more exposed to the weather regular crimp terminals are ok but for joints, splices or butt connections ( all common terms) use "Duraseal" connectors, they're brilliant, they come in the std colour coded sizes of red blue and yellow but once crimped you apply heat ( a heat gun works best but a hairdryer will do the job) and the glue lined outer recovers onto the insulation giving a waterproof seal. A std crimp link will provide a good electrical connection but the coloured flexible outer will let moisture in unless you add heat shrink over the top, problem is, the sharp edges of the hard plastic on the link can often cause chafing once installed and then you have an unknown point of entry for water and sooner or later a failed connection to find.

Duraseal are made by TE and marketed as Utilux or Raychem depending on what market you're in.
 

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... or you can roll your own .... crimp the connector, remove the plastic insulator (or use uninsulated crimp connectors), place a length of heat shrink tubing over the bared crisp connector (the type of heat shrink with "hot glue" inside of it) and shrink it down, then place one more shorter length of the same type of heat shrink tubing as a second layer. It actually works better than Duraseal since the insulation is more flexible after the job is done. That flexibility allows for a more radiused bend in the wire at the edge of the heat shrink, preventing a wire break inside of the wire's own insulation. I've been doing it that way for many years. I've used thousands of Duraseal connectors, and also made thousands of the "roll your own" type and once I learned how to do it I've never looked back.

Look closely and the internal heat activated "hot glue" (aka "sealant" or "adhesive" as it's marketed) can be seen at the very edges of the heat shrink tubing. Doing it this way allows you to tailor the insulation to whatever situation is at hand. While the insulated heat shrink tubing is still warm it can be formed around bends and curves, when it cools it retains the shape. So instead of making the heat shrink as short as is shown in the image of the power cables I make, make it longer (an inch perhaps?) and then you've got the opportunity to form the insulation around bends or corners that will retain that shape once it cools to ambient temp. Double-up on the heat shrink as seen in the picture, it just makes for a better termination (workmanship, people!).

Heat shrink tubing with adhesive/sealant is available in many many sizes as well as any number of colors, even clear. Doing things this way is also less costly than using Duraseal crimp connectors. Heat shrink with sealant can be bought in 3 foot (or even longer) lengths, allowing you to custom make any length of crimp insulation you may need. I prefer 3M brand myself.

The wire seen is (take a deep breath, long description) ... Aircraft grade MilSpec fiberglass reinforced Tefzel (aka Teflon) insulated 19 strand pretinned hookup wire. It's GREAT around heat, resists damage from high heat situations far better than vinyl or PVC insulated wire. Being 19 strand it's nice and flexible, as well as smaller in outer diameter than common 7 strand wire (the air spaces between strands are much smaller with higher strand count, thereby making the outer diameter of the wire smaller .... important when thick looms of many individual wires are made, especially in aircraft or other situations with crowded spaces where wire looms have to share space with other components or mechanical devices).

Not that any of that is crucial to motorcycles, especially our little street bikes. I'm just sharing the info ... it's always good to learn new things!

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Probably more important is using a really high quality crimping tool. That alone makes for creating properly done crimps than any other single thing. Without fail, I always recommend the Klein F2 crimping tool. Note that the crimp jaws are placed AFTER the pivot point. Cheapo "multi tools" place the crimp jaws on the wrong wide of the pivot point, which doesn't allow for proper crimping pressure. The Klein F2 is the go-to crimp/cutter for most pros. The long handles and forged steel construction provide a shit ton of crimp pressure since the long handles offer a lot of leverage. The two different crimping "jaws" allow use with insulated crimp connectors and uninsulated crimp connectors. The end-cutters are also well placed and very sharp. The F2 is roughly 10 inches overall length. The Klein F2 can be had for around $20 bucks. An excellent addition to your best tool collection. Pictured are my own, they're easily 25+ years old and have been used thousands of times. Best crimper/cutter tool ever made from my point of view.

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Like anything when it comes to motorcycles (and life in general), you may choose to do all of this any way you wish to. I've simply shared how I do it.

馃弫 馃弫 馃弫
 
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