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Discussion Starter #1
Hi guys,

Over the last few weeks I have been stopping at Fast by Ferracci's and drooling over the 1198's in stock. My last bike was a 2001 996 that I sold about four years ago. Since then I havent been riding except for taking my friends GSXR 600 around the block occasionaly.

I started riding when I was 18 (am now 32) and was wondering if buying a 1098/1198 would be a wise choice with several years hiatus.

any thoughts?

Thanks
eunos4
 

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What do you think ? Take a Rider Course.....Hit a (some:D) track day (s).


Look @ my signature :eek:
 

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You will be fine.

Just take it easy at first to re-learn exactly what it's like to ride a superbike. It takes a bit to get one's skills back.

In my experience it is not like riding bicycle. ;)
 

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Some very experienced riders went down on their new 1098's when they inadvertently locked up its very sensitive and very powerful front brake. I would learn from their experiences and get back on the road with a more forgiving model before moving to the 1098.
 

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The days are getting longer!
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4 years absence is not that long, take a rider course, go slow at first and be safe.
 

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Take a refresher course and get the bike you want. If you have that many years of riding, you will be able to handle the power if you use your head.

I´ll agree with the "powerful brakes" comment above. They are VERY good, so just be careful and try them out incl. harder and harder braking drills until you get the feel for them.
The power is also very deceptive, especially if your running the stock exhaust. Dont get cocky until you have had some seattime. The 1098 is very forgiving until it bites back, but it can bite very hard unless respected.

//amullo
 

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Your first step should be to walk away from FBF.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I don't want to buy something that I will kill myself on. Its substantially more power than my 996 and I don't want to do anything foolish. I was looking at various Japanese bikes but they just don't excite me like the 1098 does.




vwbuge - Yeah I don't think I would buy from FBF, its just the closest dealership around. I was in there around closing time yesterday and they turned the lights off on me. Not a very good way to make a sale.
 

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4 years absence is not that long, take a rider course, go slow at first and be safe.
+1

Some very experienced riders went down on their new 1098's when they inadvertently locked up its very sensitive and very powerful front brake. I would learn from their experiences and get back on the road with a more forgiving model before moving to the 1098.
I had an inadvertent stoppie bringing mine home from the dealership. The brakes are no joke.
 

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Take one out for a test ride. If you aren't comfortable on it (don't just go around the block, put some gas in it and go for a good putt, if they really want to sell one, they won't mind.), don't buy it. If it doesn't intimidate you, and you feel that you'd get used to it in a short time, go for it.
 

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That's what I did. 10 years off from riding and bought a 1098 not having ridden at all during the 10 year absence. Bike scared the living hell out of me. Took me 6 months before I felt comfortable riding it.
 

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You will feel comfortable in no time. Once you learn to ride the bike, you don't forget. Just take it easy....
 

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I was away from motorcycles for almost 10 years when, in fall of 1999, I decided I just HAD to have one of the then-new Kawasaki ZRX1100s. My dealer and mechanic (who I knew well from past experience) were a bit concerned about "re-entering" the sport on such a potent bike, but I just took it very easy for the first several months and things went fine.

It's more about the rider than the bike. Just remember the throttle goes both ways (and make sure you know which direction does what), take time to get your reaction time back, and think defensively at all times.

And, the suggestion to take an approved Rider Course (preferably the MSF Experienced Rider Course, if you can borrow a beater) is a very good one.
 
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