Rear Brake Bleeding - Ducati.ms - The Ultimate Ducati Forum
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post #1 of 11 (permalink) Old Aug 14th, 2019, 7:39 pm Thread Starter
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Rear Brake Bleeding

Is it necessary to take rear caliper off in order to bleed ? I have heard some say that it is not required to remove them.

Using the pump brake and hold , release valve to let air out then close and repeat .


Will you still need to take caliper off in order to have the bleed valve up ? If so, can the caliper be removed without removing the rear wheel ?

Last edited by jbequer; Aug 14th, 2019 at 8:00 pm.
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post #2 of 11 (permalink) Old Aug 15th, 2019, 1:13 am
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Yes you have to take it off and no you don't have to remove the wheel. You do have to remove a plastic guard attached to the swing arm, and you have to raise the caliper to its most elevated point on the opposite side of the wheel (above the swing arm), and have the bleeder pointed up.
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post #3 of 11 (permalink) Old Aug 15th, 2019, 9:56 am
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Originally Posted by appliance57 View Post
Yes you have to take it off and no you don't have to remove the wheel. You do have to remove a plastic guard attached to the swing arm, and you have to raise the caliper to its most elevated point on the opposite side of the wheel (above the swing arm), and have the bleeder pointed up.
Agree 100%. However, if you don't feel like there is air in your system, just discolored fluid or a desire for a quick flush, you can bleed while the caliper is in place. I bleed my system often, as soon as the color gets too dark for my liking, and that might be after 2000 miles, yet the brake feels fine. In that case, I might bleed with the caliper in place to save some time and flush with clean fluid.

For the rest of the bleeding schedule, absolutely remove the caliper, be careful not to strip the bolt heads as they are a little tough to access. You may want to replace the caliper mounting bolts with titanium hardware. They are not as soft as OEM. You also need to remove the three bolts that hold the plastic line shield on the bottom of the swing-arm, that protects brake line and wheel sensor electronics line.

Once that shield is removed and caliper removed, use a zip tie to hold the caliper as high as the line will allow, nipple on top. I usually zip tie it to the seat strap. Use rags to protect the frame from accidental brake fluid spurts. Make sure you put a solid object between the pads so you don't accidentally lock them together.

I use a motive pressure bleeder and it can take a full quart of fluid to move through the system to get the very last drop out. I gently move the master through limited range as the pressure bleeder does it's thing. It helps clear any air. Pressure bleeding with the motive system makes the process really easy.
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post #4 of 11 (permalink) Old Aug 15th, 2019, 11:26 am Thread Starter
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So for discolored fluid replacement, you don't need to remove caliper ? (If no air in line). That sounds like an easy fluid replacement.
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post #5 of 11 (permalink) Old Aug 15th, 2019, 11:29 am
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So for discolored fluid replacement, you don't need to remove caliper ? (If no air in line). That sounds like an easy fluid replacement.
Best practice is to get that caliper elevated because there will almost always be some air in the system to evacuate. Just saying that you can make it a bit easier if you are not long between fluid bleeds and you just want a quick flush.

Air rises, and with the nipple at the lowest point it may stay trapped if it's in the system.
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post #6 of 11 (permalink) Old Aug 15th, 2019, 11:50 am
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Gen 1 Hyper - i just blend all systems for the first time the other day. Didn't need to remove any calipers. Used that motion-pro bleeder valve tool (like $25) and that helped a bit.

I rarely use the rear brake but it's been about 4 years since that was changed so it was definitely overdue. I see the clutch fluid get dark much quicker than the fluids in the brakes.

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post #7 of 11 (permalink) Old Aug 15th, 2019, 12:00 pm
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Gen 1 Hyper - i just blend all systems for the first time the other day. Didn't need to remove any calipers. Used that motion-pro bleeder valve tool (like $25) and that helped a bit.

I rarely use the rear brake but it's been about 4 years since that was changed so it was definitely overdue. I see the clutch fluid get dark much quicker than the fluids in the brakes.
After 4 years there is definitely air in the system to get rid of. It takes and extra 10 minutes to remove the caliper, line guard, and elevate the caliper for a proper bleeding.
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post #8 of 11 (permalink) Old Aug 15th, 2019, 12:01 pm Thread Starter
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Will putting zip ties to hold brake lever down overnight remove air bubbles if any ?
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post #9 of 11 (permalink) Old Aug 15th, 2019, 12:08 pm
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Will putting zip ties to hold brake lever down overnight remove air bubbles if any ?
My understanding is that the method gathers the tiny bubbles together and move the air to a high point in the system.

My dealer said Ducati does not approve of the method because it can harm the ABS system.

Others swear by it. I have read that doing it for an hour provides whatever benefit you could get and after that NADA.

I would love to see some scientific evidence about what happens when done. So much folklore in this business supported by opinion and anecdote. I got scolded in a thread discussing oil filters and oil changes when I questioned accepted truths which are not well supported by evidence.

In other words, if you do keep pressure on the brake pedal overnight, make sure you do it with the caliper elevated, and then in the morning, bleed it a bit more to remove the air that should have risen to the top.

Good luck!

Last edited by Pard; Aug 15th, 2019 at 12:26 pm.
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post #10 of 11 (permalink) Old Aug 15th, 2019, 1:09 pm Thread Starter
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I do the zip tie method on my mountain bike and it works awesome.
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