How long do you wait for your bike to warm up? - Ducati.ms - The Ultimate Ducati Forum
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post #1 of 18 (permalink) Old Jan 7th, 2016, 5:48 pm Thread Starter
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How long do you wait for your bike to warm up?

Have a 08 1100s and this is my first air cooled bike. Given the dash reading is the oil, rather than water temp, takes a while to read above "low" and get up oil up to temperature (particularly given the weather here now in NYC)

Just got the bike and only has ~2k miles on it so don't want to put any unnecessary wear on the motor. What temp do you let your bike warm up to before you take off?


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post #2 of 18 (permalink) Old Jan 7th, 2016, 7:23 pm
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I've had an '08 Hyper since new, I always wait until the "low" warning goes off. 35,000 miles and no problems yet.

Ducati valve trains are notoriously sensitive to lubrication issues. Yes, it takes a while in the winter to warm up but why risk premature engine problems for a couple of minutes.

Enjoy.

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post #3 of 18 (permalink) Old Jan 7th, 2016, 7:45 pm
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I usually let it warm up 5 minutes and then run it real easy till 150 minimum . I don't ride the hyper in cold weather. Until I put the hi cap battery cables on it wouldn't start much below 60 ,now it starts in the 40's . It's not fun to ride in cold weather, usually I put it up the 1st of december . I'll ride my Valkyrie all winter if the roads are dry and it's near 50 like today

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post #4 of 18 (permalink) Old Jan 7th, 2016, 8:18 pm
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I use just as much choke as necessary (mine is an older, carbureted model) to get it started, and let it warm at a constant low throttle until the revs rise without adding gas (indicating the oil has circulated through the engine and the friction level has reduced). This takes about 30 seconds. I then ride off, being gentle with the throttle for another minute or two. By then, the choke has been returned to normal, and I ride however I want (bearing in mind cold tires, etc.). If it is above about 50F (10C), the choke is usually not needed at all. My bike has no temperature indicator of any kind -- just speedo, odo, and a few idiot lights.

Like Edducati, I had to install hi-cap (4 gauge) cables for cold starting, and I added a dedicated ground back from the starter to the battery at the same time. If it is dry out, I ride down to about 20F (-7C) or so. I've got 247,000 miles on the original engine, so far, so I can say this pattern of behavior won't hurt the bike much.

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post #5 of 18 (permalink) Old Jan 7th, 2016, 9:55 pm
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I turn it on and ride. No need for it to idle and warm up. It'll warm up when you're riding it. Just take it easy for the first little bit.
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post #6 of 18 (permalink) Old Jan 7th, 2016, 10:09 pm
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Great question! It seem sensible and prudent to let it warm up then ride, but have you seen the motogp guys? They fire the bike up in pit lane and then their off! I'm not sure what to make of that? Do they pre-heat the oil, is warming up the engine complete nonsense?

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post #7 of 18 (permalink) Old Jan 8th, 2016, 12:42 am
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kdehkordi View Post
Great question! It seem sensible and prudent to let it warm up then ride, but have you seen the motogp guys? They fire the bike up in pit lane and then their off! I'm not sure what to make of that? Do they pre-heat the oil, is warming up the engine complete nonsense?
Racing has entirely different criteria. And MotoGP engine life is measured in minutes, not years.

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post #8 of 18 (permalink) Old Jan 8th, 2016, 9:54 am
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I basically start the bike, put on my helmet and gloves, hop on, and ride gently until its warm. i.e. Warm up at idle is at most a minute. Your oil system should be fully pressurized within a few seconds of start up.

PhilBoncer mentioned cold tires, this is important, I felt the frontend of my Versys lose traction this morning while taking my first corner.


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post #9 of 18 (permalink) Old Jan 8th, 2016, 9:58 am
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I also concur with it is only as long as it takes for me to put any remaining gear on and close the garage then I'm off. I take it easy but it warms up pretty quick. During the winter I would be more concerned with getting temp into the tires before any significant lean angle.
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post #10 of 18 (permalink) Old Jan 8th, 2016, 10:18 am
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Engine Warm-Up Period

The main reason that you allow a warm-up period is to let the engine get warm and help vaporize the fuel. Until then, you'll get more misfires from incomplete combustion. So as soon as the bike will take throttle smoothly there's no reason to continue warming up — it’s ready to ride.

From a lubrication point-of-view, the worst condition for wear is when the engine is cold. At startup, the only thing protecting against metal-to-metal contact is a residual thin film of oil. (Synthetic oils have better film strength, BTW.) So when you start the bike, avoid revving the engine excessively while the oil pump begins to send oil through the oil galleries. This can take a couple of minutes in Ducati engines. After this, you can ride immediately (at moderate engine speeds, of course) but you should wait for normal operating temperatures before booting-it.

We know that an engine should be at its design operating temperature to make good power. Operate at too low a temperature and the engine is less efficient and makes less power. Higher temperatures are more thermodynamically efficient, but run at too high a temperature and you exceed the thermal expansion design basis of critical components and raise fuel octane requirements that can cause engine knock. Ducati’s use engine management computers incorporating a coolant temperature sensor to retard the engine ignition timing enough to compensate for any increase in octane requirement when operating temperatures increase.

In the Ducati system, the sensor tells the ECU to stop warm-up fuel enrichment at around 65C. On bikes made before 1995 or so, it was at 85C. So from a fuel correction standpoint, the proper operating temperature is above these values. Reduce the coolant temperature below them and you're not operating efficiently. The engine will be running too rich.

Duane Mitchel reported that he ran a series of tests to establish the optimum running temperature for a race bike and found that 85C is perfect. Above that , you’ll lose horsepower fairly quickly (down about 15 hp at 100C) and below that the same (down about six hp at 65C).

In cold weather, the trick to temporarily getting back to the best engine temperature for performance and economy is to make the radiator effectively smaller; by preventing the cooler air from reaching a portion of the radiator’s cooling fins, thereby reducing it’s cooling capacity. You cover a portion of the radiator to reduce cooling air flow and raise the coolant temperature. How much radiator area you cover depends on how low an ambient air temperature you expect. Trucks in arctic climates, for example, will run with 90% of their radiator covered.
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Last edited by Shazaam; Jan 8th, 2016 at 10:45 am.
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