900SS-SP restoration story - Page 2 - Ducati.ms - The Ultimate Ducati Forum
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post #11 of 112 (permalink) Old May 23rd, 2017, 8:43 am
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Not quite yet.
The new exhaust system came from FBF and it has the "spaghetti" header. Beautifully crafted piece but I'm still working to get it to fit properly. The front pipe was too close to the oil cooler line but I was able to move the cooler over slightly to hopefully provide enough clearance. Current issue is it is touching the left faring insulation. Looks like I have to move the header higher to get away from this and then pray the cans will still be positioned properly.
Nothing is easy!
BTW: I also had the dealer replace all the fluids including the fork oil which involves pulling them out and turning them upside down.
I really admire your goal of going back to original. My exhaust system had replacement carbon cans installed (poorly too) and I would have had to source a set of nice originals. In addition - I'm heading for a more open system to let out that great Ducati sound. The top of my airbox had also been cut off so I found an original replacement from Ed at Duc Power. I was worried the open filter would have had water issues if it happened to rain.
Looking forward to more stories of your adventure.
As one who has a full SilMoto system - match it up with a set of FCR's (sounds like you can afford them ). The two work together beautifully. As for the airbox - as per my sig - I'm running mine with the lid on (and uncut), but with the rubber 'trumpets' removed, so it breathes through the two large holes left. Reduces the intake noise by quite a bit (over a lidless or cut down lid), but still flows far better than with the trumpets fitted. And NO water issues (I've ridden in some truly horrible conditions over the years).

I'm running my exhaust open (no dB killers), and while noisy when I'm hard on the gas, it's remarkably quiet at cruising (100-110kph) speeds. I tried the dB killers with just the mufflers and everything else standard, and they restricted the exhaust so much, the bike would hardly run - and it was WAY quieter than the stock mufflers. An improvement was made by removing the 'disc' from the inside end of the dB killers - this brought the noise level up to about par with the standard mufflers, and allowed the bike to run. That was going to be plan B if the open system was too loud to pass a WOF (govt. roadworthiness tests), but it passed easily.

'95 900 Superlight IV #064

Mods are: K&N filter, airbox lid on with rubber trumpets removed, MBP collets, full SMI (SilMoto Italia) spaghetti exhaust with 'open' carbon cans, 41mm FCR's - #182 mains!, Barnett alloy clutch basket, Oberon slave cylinder, Ohlins fork springs, Ohlins rear shock, Verlicchi swingarm.
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post #12 of 112 (permalink) Old May 23rd, 2017, 11:31 am
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Sorry - while I'd love to have a set of FCR's they are certainly out of the question for me at this point!
Like you, I left the trumpets off of the lid. Also glad to hear you've not had any water ingestion issues. I'm assuming you do get some rain in the north end of New Zealand too.
Did you install the Sil Moto's? If so, did you have any fitment issues?
I've dropped a shot below of my new header vs. the stock Ducati item. Is this similar to yours??
Thanks.
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1995 900 SS SP #001 (now sold - again)
1975 860 GT (sold - but got me hooked)
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post #13 of 112 (permalink) Old May 23rd, 2017, 1:24 pm
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Very cool project. I am looking to seeing how it all goes. Best of luck with it all.
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1996 900 SS/SP #C22, 1996 916 Corsa (ex-Ferracci), 1998 916 SPS #774, 1999 748R (race), 2001 996R (US), 2001 996R (Euro), 2002 998R #481, 2011 848 EVO (race), 2008 1098R #262, 2014 1199 Superleggera #213
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post #14 of 112 (permalink) Old May 23rd, 2017, 11:16 pm Thread Starter
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Bodywork and suspension

In the process of stripping the bike down to remove the engine, I brought together all of the body work and took it to my local painter. He looked at the parts and gave me an estimate, commenting on how bad the side fairings were (I agree with his assessment!). He told me to order the correct stickers from the dealer.

With the body work disposed of, I decided that the suspension needed to be completely rebuilt. My go to guys for that is Race Tech (somewhat local to me) so I delivered the Showa forks and rear shock with the instructions to "do whatever it needs".

After wrestling the engine out, I popped off the heads to see if there was any damage to the valves (I had suspected that maybe a belt had broken). To my surprise, there wasn't any sign of damage.

Because I am a curious soul, the pistons and cylinders came off so I could get a look at the infamous crankshaft plug backing out issue. To my pleasant surprise, the plug had not backed out (yet!). But, there was some bad news inside the case. I was able to see the transmission gears and 4th gear on the output shaft was coming apart (see photo). This meant that the cases needed to be split to replace the transmission.

Additionally, the broken spring I had noticed on the engine drain plug did turn out to be from the shifter mechanism. I wonder how long that had been broken and what that did to the shifting action.

It looks like plenty of work to do plus cleaning, inspecting, ordering/sourcing parts, etc.
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Old & Slow; 2001 748, 1997 916, WSM Leggero, 1999 900SS track bike, 2002 998 track bike, Bimota SB6

Last edited by T8KC; May 23rd, 2017 at 11:29 pm.
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post #15 of 112 (permalink) Old May 24th, 2017, 8:36 am
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Looks like the cylinder studs had been changed to the good studs at some point.

The damage to the gear is common with running oil that cannot handle the loads, we used to see similar with golden spectro in race bikes so we stopped using it. Gearboxes should be plentiful keep in mind when you change it you will need to re-shim everything. Best to look at all bearings while you are in there, not cheap to change the mains but while you are there it may be a good idea. Look at the crank plug and see if it is a hex head or a flat blade screw type, oem would have been a flat blade. If not someone was there before.
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post #16 of 112 (permalink) Old May 24th, 2017, 10:20 am Thread Starter
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Engine rebuilding

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Originally Posted by ducvet View Post
Looks like the cylinder studs had been changed to the good studs at some point.

The damage to the gear is common with running oil that cannot handle the loads, we used to see similar with golden spectro in race bikes so we stopped using it. Gearboxes should be plentiful keep in mind when you change it you will need to re-shim everything. Best to look at all bearings while you are in there, not cheap to change the mains but while you are there it may be a good idea. Look at the crank plug and see if it is a hex head or a flat blade screw type, oem would have been a flat blade. If not someone was there before.
Thanks for the info DucVet. I have a spare transmission in hand from my 900SSie rebuild when I installed a close ratio gearbox in that bike.


Old & Slow; 2001 748, 1997 916, WSM Leggero, 1999 900SS track bike, 2002 998 track bike, Bimota SB6
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post #17 of 112 (permalink) Old May 24th, 2017, 10:23 am
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Sorry - while I'd love to have a set of FCR's they are certainly out of the question for me at this point!
Like you, I left the trumpets off of the lid. Also glad to hear you've not had any water ingestion issues. I'm assuming you do get some rain in the north end of New Zealand too.
Did you install the Sil Moto's? If so, did you have any fitment issues?
I've dropped a shot below of my new header vs. the stock Ducati item. Is this similar to yours??
Thanks.
Re the FCR's - save your pennies. I know I thought my stock setup was working OK - then I fitted the pipes and FCR's. After that - I was kicking myself for not doing it years earlier. There is THAT much of a difference.

Yup. It rains here. We're (well, where I am) sub-tropical, and have an average rainfall of 1500mm (nearly 5 feet) a year. I've done rides of 4+ hours in bucketing down rain, with no problems. I don't know about a pod setup on the Duc's - but the ones on my old Suzuki 1100 used to choke up a bit in really wet weather- but absolutely no problems with the airbox unit on my 900.

Yep - installed them myself. All fitted together without a hitch. I never worried too much about the proximity of the header and the oil line - though I did manage to move the line slightly (easier than the header) to give an extra mm or so clearance, but it's never caused any problems (at the end of the day, the two are in proximity for only a short distance). One day, I may invest in some exhaust wrap, and wrap the headers - partially at least, which should reduce heat transfer into the line. Those look just like mine - there's a picture of mine in the 'Spaghetti' thread somewhere. Ah yes...


'95 900 Superlight IV #064

Mods are: K&N filter, airbox lid on with rubber trumpets removed, MBP collets, full SMI (SilMoto Italia) spaghetti exhaust with 'open' carbon cans, 41mm FCR's - #182 mains!, Barnett alloy clutch basket, Oberon slave cylinder, Ohlins fork springs, Ohlins rear shock, Verlicchi swingarm.
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post #18 of 112 (permalink) Old May 24th, 2017, 5:00 pm
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Man all that brings back memories.
I had to change a frame on my old 92 900ss due to cracks and ducati na warrantied the frame but would not do the labor. This was in the early 2000's so I decided to blow everything apart in my garage.

bummer on the gearbox failure but rad that you had a spare gearset laying around.

Good luck on the rest
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97 900SS/SP, Yellow, FCR41, Ohlins rear, Alcon 6 piston, Termi Duals, Ca-C Coils.
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post #19 of 112 (permalink) Old May 24th, 2017, 10:20 pm Thread Starter
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Engine disassembly

Before I tackled the engine work in earnest, the wheels were cleaned including removing the rotors. I like to clean the rotors off the wheels to inspect them more thoroughly and get them really clean. That darn old brake dust is really invasive and stubborn to remove. Additionally, the hardware can be cleaned in my ultrasonic bath and I will know that the rotor bolts are properly torqued with Loctite on the threads. Call it piece of mind.

All in all the wheels cleaned up nicely even though they are painted black (not the original color). I figured that wouldn't be such a bad thing and obviously didn't impact the riding experience.

The next job was to take the engine apart starting with the heads. I wanted to confirm the condition of the cams, rocker arms, valves, guides, etc. and get the heads ready to be cleaned and soda blasted.

All in all, the parts seemed to be in good shape which is surprising considering the engine was obviously neglected in it's past life. I mean, how many of you would leave an engine open to the elements for years on end?

After the heads were disassembled, I attacked the crankcase. These carb engines are more of a challenge to take apart because of the ignition pick-ups. The connectors have to be carefully released from the wires and everything marked.

About a year ago, I bit the bullet and bought the factory primary gear remover. What difference that makes! The gear just pops off easily. In the past I have struggled to get the gear off the end of the crank.

Looking at the internals, everything looks to be in good shape (9,500 miles on the bike) except the gear box. I will replace the output shaft bearing for sure, but will just inspect the others as they look pretty darn good. Of course, all the seals need to be replaced. I will measure and inspect the pistons/cylinders and rings.

Aside from the tranny issue, not too bad! By the way, the crank plug was ok, but not super tight.
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Old & Slow; 2001 748, 1997 916, WSM Leggero, 1999 900SS track bike, 2002 998 track bike, Bimota SB6
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post #20 of 112 (permalink) Old May 25th, 2017, 12:25 am
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looks like a ton of fun lol.
I actually enjoy that kinda work.
I didn't know the full floater rotors came on the 96. Nice.

97 900SS/SP, Yellow, FCR41, Ohlins rear, Alcon 6 piston, Termi Duals, Ca-C Coils.
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