750ss/800ss general info. - Ducati.ms - The Ultimate Ducati Forum
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post #1 of 25 (permalink) Old Feb 13th, 2006, 10:59 pm
jtex06
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750ss/800ss general info.

Hi. I'm new to the board, but my fascination with Ducatis has been around for a while. I was wondering about the 1999+ 750ss/800ss models. I'm looking for a bike mostly for the street (e.g., commuting, 200+ mile trips into the mountains, etc.). Might do a few track days/track schools, but they would be pretty limited in number. I won't be doing much two-up riding either.

I'm on my second bike, an FZR600, and have several thousand miles under my belt (not a newbie, but not an expert either). I don't need the latest technology, evidenced by the FZR, or the power of a liter bike. I would like something that can carve canyons but still handle in town traffic (and I would prefer that it be a Ducati).

Here are some of my questions:

1. Are the clutches as stiff as some say? Is the slow speed u-turn radius reasonable (for a sport bike)? How do these bikes "carry their weight" at slow speeds? Just trying to gauge metro area/traffic riding.

2. How comfortable are these bikes? My current bike is no sport tourer (in fact, it's a pretty aggressive position), but I can handle 200+ miles a day on it by using my lower body to reduce the weight on my wrists. But that bike is sort of my bottom line comfort-wise. I couldn't ride a bike that's less comfortable than the FZR. And I ain't getting younger.

3. I read on www.motorcycle.com that "countersteering is almost counter-productive" on the 750ss, that you have to body steer it through the twisties. Is that really true? And if so, is that just for the 750ss, or does the 800ss steer that way, too? My current ride will countersteer with ease in the twisties (without having to body steer), and I'd hate to go to something that takes a lot more effort.

4. Is the power difference between the 750ss and 800ss that significant (is it worth ponying up for a later model 800ss)? I know that I'm going to lose a bit of hp but probably gain some torque by giving up the FZR for one of these. I don't need to go faster in a straight line, but I don't want to go substantially slower. (I know that I could look at the 900ss/1000ss, but I'd rather have the lighter 750ss/800ss).

5. How is the seat height of these two models for someone 5'6"-5'7"?

That's probably longer than it needed to be. Sorry about that. Anyway, if anyone could put in their two cents, that would be great.

Thanks in advance.
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post #2 of 25 (permalink) Old Feb 14th, 2006, 4:12 am
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtex06
I know that I could look at the 900ss/1000ss, but I'd rather have the lighter 750ss/800ss
Lighter? Not much, only 2 or 3 lbs.

Tom
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post #3 of 25 (permalink) Old Feb 14th, 2006, 9:43 am
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I noticed that when I switched to heli-bars (wider and more "flat") my 750 sport was easier to counter steer. My theory is that the stock bars are just so narrow and angled downward that it seems like counter steering doesn't work as well. Also the wet clutch in the 750 (I think the 800 is also wet?) is not stiff at all. It's about average.

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post #4 of 25 (permalink) Old Feb 14th, 2006, 10:00 am
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I'll try to answer a few of your questions. There is a little difference in power between the 750 and 800. Brad Black's website has some real world dyno pulls, and the 800 is a lot closer to the 900 as far as output. Add the closer ratio 6-speed gearbox, and the 800 starts to look pretty good.

You're going to want to add some Helibars. I'm about 5'9 and the reach to the OEM clip on's was a bit much. The Helibars helped a bunch.

If you're not in a rush, try to find a clean 03 800SS. The 04-06 800's have the down-graded suspension and 3-spoke boat anchor wheels.

This is just one person's opinion, but I own and ride an 05 800. I love it to pieces.
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post #5 of 25 (permalink) Old Feb 14th, 2006, 11:07 am
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Quote:
I read on www.motorcycle.com that "countersteering is almost counter-productive" on the 750ss, that you have to body steer it through the twisties. Is that really true? And if so, is that just for the 750ss, or does the 800ss steer that way, too? My current ride will countersteer with ease in the twisties (without having to body steer), and I'd hate to go to something that takes a lot more effort.
I think we are just misunderstanding each other here but "countersteering" is not something you do on the twisties...."countersteering" is what you do when you put your body weight on the OPPOSITE side of the turn as in a very low speed parking lot type turn. So I'm not quite sure what you mean between countersteer and body steer. With that said however, this thing is a dream in the twisties. I've been trying for ever to get my wife to start hanging off the side of hers and she wont do it, but every time I look back, she's right there hanging with us. I've had the front end get a little wobbly but still a very stable, capable bike for what it is. This thing will go clean to the edge of the tires without even trying. Clutch, you'll get used to. Good thing it's hydraulic. Low speed never been a factor for me. Low speed steering on any sport bike is going to be alittel dicey much below 10mph. Comfort is too opinionated. I did 380 miles in one shot only stopping for gas once and for minimum time. My body and wrist felt fine but I thought my a$$ was gone. If I still rode this bike I'd get a sergeant seat. Power...it's a twin. It's no rocket ship and the current crop of 600 bikes out will smoke this thing in ANY category (except looks or sex appeal) but it's no slouch and that twin torque is just too much fun for me. My wife's about 5'6" and rides every day with no suspension mods. It does have a tall seat heighth though and on level ground her heels are barely off the pavement. I wouldn't say it's ever been a factor though. One other thing I don't like about the older 750's is the frame and wheels have a rougher coating or paint or something on them and they never look clean. Always looks dirty and faded to me. I hate that when you compare it to the newer 800/900/1000's. Good luck.

***desmonoob, didn't you read basic SS modifications part 1??? #1 modification for all SS owners...Get those tie wraps off that frame!!! Just kidding buddy. High-Mounts look friggin awesome. That's gonna be my next purchase for this bike.



Last edited by galaxy; Feb 14th, 2006 at 1:06 pm.
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post #6 of 25 (permalink) Old Feb 14th, 2006, 2:01 pm
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Originally Posted by galaxy
"countersteering" is not something you do on the twisties
What!?

I ALWAYS counter-steer in the twisties.

Mind you, around here, there is nothing except twisties.

But, really, how can you come up with such a statement?

Tom
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post #7 of 25 (permalink) Old Feb 14th, 2006, 3:29 pm
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We must just have a different idea of/definition of the term "countersteering"...I don't know what else to tell ya. That's how I come up with such a statement. Countersteering to me is when say...making a very sharp left hand, slow speed turn you lean your bike far over to the left, turn your wheel to the left, and shift your body weight to the right side of the bike to keep the bike from falling over. If I'm wrong, I'm wrong...sue me. I have never heard the term "countersteering" for what you do in the twisties, so please explain your definition of the term.
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post #8 of 25 (permalink) Old Feb 14th, 2006, 3:32 pm
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Countersteering means that whan you want to go right, you steer left, which causes the bike to fall right, into the turn. Fastest way to make quick turns.

Tom
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post #9 of 25 (permalink) Old Feb 14th, 2006, 4:28 pm
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I don't know how anybody can even concentrate on reading this thread, with galaxy posting those photos...[please post more]

But, galaxy, what tom is trying to say is this:

to initiate a fast turn in, apply a bit of forward pressure on the "turn side" bar. Ie: left turn, left bar input... this will cause the bike to tip off axis to the left very quickly. try it slowly a few times while going in a straight line and you'll know exactly what he's talking about, you probably do it all the time and don't even realize it.
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post #10 of 25 (permalink) Old Feb 14th, 2006, 5:15 pm
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Smile

In other words....when in the full riding position, the young lady should begin the turn with a slight input to her right foot to position the bike, and then provide progressively greater inputs to the left foot to complete the turn.

In no time at all she will be bragging about how nicely she dragged her elbow through the turns.

Further pictures expected !

Quote:
Originally Posted by blade625CT
I don't know how anybody can even concentrate on reading this thread, with galaxy posting those photos...[please post more]

But, galaxy, what tom is trying to say is this:

to initiate a fast turn in, apply a bit of forward pressure on the "turn side" bar. Ie: left turn, left bar input... this will cause the bike to tip off axis to the left very quickly. try it slowly a few times while going in a straight line and you'll know exactly what he's talking about, you probably do it all the time and don't even realize it.

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