Winter 916 revival - Ducati.ms - The Ultimate Ducati Forum
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 49 (permalink) Old Nov 5th, 2018, 4:16 pm Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
wetzel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: Belmont, MA, USA
Posts: 101
Winter 916 revival

Hey forum,

I picked up a 1997 916 from ducati.ms forum member spitfire1776 on Saturday (made the 14 hour round trip in one day!). The bike has been sitting in a climate controlled storage for 7-8 years now, but has been started and run periodically (I am not sure how many times, but it was at least run once last year).

I'm no mechanic, but I try to do my own work, so I'll be trying to do all of the work necessary to restore this bike to tip-top shape, with the goal of taking it to some track days next year. After that, I'm not sure, I might try to sell it and buy a newer bike, or I may fall in love with the 916 as many others have and just keep it.

Here's what I know it needs:
-Heavy duty cleaning (the bike is pretty filthy right now). This probably means taking apart and cleaning the swingarm pivot axle and steering head bearing, and rear wheel axle (I've read about some bushing that can come loose and cause damage)...
-New brake lines, clutch lines
-Timing belts replaced (according to seller they have about 3k miles on them, but they are almost 10 years old now)
-Instrument lenses are all cracked and hard to read (might try to cut the lenses and replace with something... no clear plan yet)
-Tank fell off a trailer at some point and has some gnarly scratches on it. May repaint?
-Standard maintenance: Oil filter (and oil)/Fuel filter/Battery/Chain/sprockets (I plan to go 15/39)/Tires

The previous owner upgraded the rectifier and claims to have had no problems with electrical systems. I will probably want to put LED headlights in, not only for their lower power draw but also for the greater visibility.

I've also been told the rocker arms were replaced with some that do not have the chrome flaking problems, so I should be good in that area.

The engine was rebuilt around 10k miles ago, and there are approximately 36k miles on the frame.

I'm not sure what else I should be focusing on. This project will probably take me all winter as the bike lives at my Dad's shop, which is about 2 hours away, so I will only be able to get there every few weekends or so. Each trip I'll add updates and more pictures.

Anyway, I'd appreciate ANY advice, as I don't wholly know what I'm doing, and I'm very excited to get this thing running.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_20181104_100045.jpg
Views:	251
Size:	766.7 KB
ID:	931959   Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_20181104_100045 (1).jpg
Views:	277
Size:	776.5 KB
ID:	931961  
wetzel is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 49 (permalink) Old Nov 5th, 2018, 5:12 pm
Prolific Poster Award
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: melbourne, victoria, australia
Posts: 4,218
Man you have your work cut out for yourself. Some very nasty corrosion on the aluminium parts that even after cleaning will look very ordinary. NOTE THIS. The swinger pivot could be EXTREMELY, and I do mean EXTREMELY, difficult to remove because of corrosion on the shaft. To top that off, ALL engine bolts need to be undone completely an the main frame at the pivot bolt SPREAD so the swinger spacers come out of the frame recess that hold it in place. If it were mine the first thing I would do is wash it down, blow most of the water off with compressed air then SPRAY THE BIKE HEAD TO TOE WITH WD-40. Lots of WD-40, then leave it sit for a few days then wipe down and start working. Have fun.
xracer is online now  
post #3 of 49 (permalink) Old Nov 5th, 2018, 5:20 pm Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
wetzel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: Belmont, MA, USA
Posts: 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by xracer View Post
Man you have your work cut out for yourself. Some very nasty corrosion on the aluminium parts that even after cleaning will look very ordinary. NOTE THIS. The swinger pivot could be EXTREMELY, and I do mean EXTREMELY, difficult to remove because of corrosion on the shaft. To top that off, ALL engine bolts need to be undone completely an the main frame at the pivot bolt SPREAD so the swinger spacers come out of the frame recess that hold it in place. If it were mine the first thing I would do is wash it down, blow most of the water off with compressed air then SPRAY THE BIKE HEAD TO TOE WITH WD-40. Lots of WD-40, then leave it sit for a few days then wipe down and start working. Have fun.
Yeah, that's good advice.

If you are talking about that white stuff on the front wheel, that's actually an industrial cleaner because while I was moving the bike I didn't realize the bleeder valve was open and the front brakes ejected hydraulic fluid all over the wheel. That stuff wipes right off. I've also got a set of Marchesini's that will be going on.

Near the swingarm itself, it actually looks fairly clean. I'll take some pictures next time I go down (which will be when I'm doing exactly what you said and just cleaning the crap out of it).
wetzel is offline  
 
post #4 of 49 (permalink) Old Nov 5th, 2018, 6:44 pm
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 1,135
+1 what xracer said but I would use PB blast instead of WD40. Works miracles on seized bolts in “half“ the time.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

999R - cult bike!
900SS - 1995
748LE - sold :-(, but looking
draganc is offline  
post #5 of 49 (permalink) Old Nov 5th, 2018, 6:47 pm
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 1,135
PS: fuel Filter and hoses.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
ProphetPVD likes this.

999R - cult bike!
900SS - 1995
748LE - sold :-(, but looking
draganc is offline  
post #6 of 49 (permalink) Old Nov 5th, 2018, 6:48 pm
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 1,135
PPS: send out the fuel injectors for a professional cleaning, such as witch hunter or others.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
ProphetPVD and wetzel like this.

999R - cult bike!
900SS - 1995
748LE - sold :-(, but looking
draganc is offline  
post #7 of 49 (permalink) Old Nov 5th, 2018, 10:40 pm
Prolific Poster Award
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: melbourne, victoria, australia
Posts: 4,218
Quote:
Originally Posted by wetzel View Post
Yeah, that's good advice.

If you are talking about that white stuff on the front wheel, that's actually an industrial cleaner because while I was moving the bike I didn't realize the bleeder valve was open and the front brakes ejected hydraulic fluid all over the wheel. That stuff wipes right off. I've also got a set of Marchesini's that will be going on.

Near the swingarm itself, it actually looks fairly clean. I'll take some pictures next time I go down (which will be when I'm doing exactly what you said and just cleaning the crap out of it).
it can be spotless but the pivot axle can and does corrode severely. just saying beware because ive removed enough of them to know better. same with steering bearings, seen plenty of corroded lowers on bikes that are apparently well looked after.
wetzel likes this.
xracer is online now  
post #8 of 49 (permalink) Old Nov 6th, 2018, 9:26 am Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
wetzel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: Belmont, MA, USA
Posts: 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by xracer View Post
it can be spotless but the pivot axle can and does corrode severely. just saying beware because ive removed enough of them to know better. same with steering bearings, seen plenty of corroded lowers on bikes that are apparently well looked after.
Ahh, I see what you mean. OK, I will be mentally prepared.
wetzel is offline  
post #9 of 49 (permalink) Old Nov 6th, 2018, 9:27 am Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
wetzel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: Belmont, MA, USA
Posts: 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by draganc View Post
PPS: send out the fuel injectors for a professional cleaning, such as witch hunter or others.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Huh, this is really cool, thanks for the tip. I was just going to run the first tank or two with seafoam.
wetzel is offline  
post #10 of 49 (permalink) Old Nov 6th, 2018, 10:46 am
Site Sponsor
 
ducatimike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Rocklin, CA, USA
Posts: 1,578
Check wiring for hot spots, especially the two wires from the alternator onward. This stretch was underdesigned for amount of current and the quality of the wire was sub par.
ducatimike is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Ducati.ms - The Ultimate Ducati Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
916 Winter upgrade . . . . . . . Torquejunkie Superbikes 20 Sep 11th, 2018 3:20 pm
winter riders: what gloves, give proper protection and insulation spikey1973 Sport Touring 13 Jun 21st, 2018 7:22 pm
1995 Ducati 916 casor Bikes 1 Jun 2nd, 2017 3:00 pm
95 Ducati 916 P8 need part numbers AshleySurfs Superbikes 7 Oct 20th, 2016 4:32 am
1997 Ducati 916. DC Area. Survivor quality, excellent condition with records. TheVanillaThrilla Bikes 29 Feb 18th, 2016 7:23 pm

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome