Aftermarket shocks/springs - Ducati.ms - The Ultimate Ducati Forum
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post #1 of 18 (permalink) Old Jun 1st, 2019, 6:46 pm Thread Starter
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Aftermarket shocks/springs

Searched around for related topics and found nothing for the MTS.

Although I like the relatively soft set up on the '15 MTS, there's room for improvement. Question is, how to get there? New spring thrown on the existing Sachs/Ohlins? Rebuild the unit itself with new bushings and oil?

One aspect of bike ownership that escapes most riders (including me), is the frequency of shock/fork services. Same applies to cars but different discussion. After many years of dealing with used and near-new bikes, it's obvious this is one of the most overlooked safety concerns, right behind brakes (and the required flushes!). Wilbers says send it back every two years for a freshenup.

Since Ducati throws fairly high-spec kit on the MTS and other expensive models, it's fair to say it's not so much an issue compared to a "parts bin" Jap bike like the inadequately suspended FZ7 and the like. That being said...

Take a look at the Wilbers for Ducati, and weigh in if you or anyone else has used it. One of these shocks transformed my FZ1. Around $550 US, it was the best money spent for those of us that actually commute hard daily. Here's the model they list. It's twice the price, but I imagine a Ducati service gets up halfway there.

https://www.wilbers-shop.de/en/Motor...ur=3&year=2015

The remote preload adjustment for the MTS is fine and dandy if you need a wide range of adjustment. Most of us dwell in that one space, with the same loads, daily driving.

My bike is approaching 18K miles quickly and I have the fuel issues sorted. The handling has held firm, but will degrade over the next 18K and I want it better, not a gradual degradation. Looking to head that off. Anyone go past OEM/Ohlins to another manufacturer?

Thanks

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post #2 of 18 (permalink) Old Jun 1st, 2019, 8:40 pm
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Have you considered having the OEM units redone by a suspension pro ? Probably no more expensive than replacements but you’ll end up with upgraded units that are taylored to your weight and riding style.
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post #3 of 18 (permalink) Old Jun 2nd, 2019, 8:38 am
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Besides being soft is there anything else you don't like about the oem suspenders? I'm 220lbs without gear and on oem suspension on my 16 I'm easily within good sag numbers (added preload front and rear). I found the front would dive too much but after adding preload to get proper sag I find at speed the fork dives just enough to set the front end trail braking and never find the rear squishy or out of sorts. Bike turns in, holds a line, and exits cleanly with excellent road feedback and I find the ride excellent.
Unless you don't like the valving I'd just swap in springs that suit you when refreshing the suspension.

If I was going to do a lot of trackdays I'd consider different suspension but speaking as someone who has lots of track experience and built track bikes with high-spec suspension I honestly feel the oem skyhook works excellent on the road no matter the riders capabilities (when set up correctly of course).

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post #4 of 18 (permalink) Old Jun 2nd, 2019, 10:52 am
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I can pretty much guarantee those shocks will be a problem mounted on the S (where the ecu expects a semi-active rear)... codes and misery trying to figure out how to stop them.

If you're 100% sportmode and never ride any other way (touring) then the Sach's is likely not adding much (and the non-s version of the bike is hopefully the one you bought). If you like riding hard but also need to tour then IMO semi-active is well worth it (I'd never want to switch to a fixed setup personally).

IMO what the DVT multi's really need are more progressive spring options... we can get fixed rate aftermarket springs but then you're sacrificing touring chops on the altar of performance (assuming that 95% of riders don't go through a manual adjustment every time their riding circumstances change) - I would like maybe 15-20% higher rates but maintaining the same progressive ratio. Nobody out there doing that the last time I checked (last year).
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post #5 of 18 (permalink) Old Jun 3rd, 2019, 11:13 pm Thread Starter
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I can pretty much guarantee those shocks will be a problem mounted on the S (where the ecu expects a semi-active rear)... codes and misery trying to figure out how to stop them.

If you're 100% sportmode and never ride any other way (touring) then the Sach's is likely not adding much (and the non-s version of the bike is hopefully the one you bought). If you like riding hard but also need to tour then IMO semi-active is well worth it (I'd never want to switch to a fixed setup personally).

IMO what the DVT multi's really need are more progressive spring options... we can get fixed rate aftermarket springs but then you're sacrificing touring chops on the altar of performance (assuming that 95% of riders don't go through a manual adjustment every time their riding circumstances change) - I would like maybe 15-20% higher rates but maintaining the same progressive ratio. Nobody out there doing that the last time I checked (last year).
These are all good points but coming up on a year and haven't taken it out of touring mode. I guess I need to evaluate again after the full service. Fork oil/seals will be changed and the local dealer does full shock service. The owner said 30-40K is more typical for rear refresh. Buuut, Wilbers uses the same high-spec innards and suggests a freshen up after two years of use. Something about a trade-off between smooth operation and longevity.

Maybe a better question is how many here have had their shock serviced and at what mileage? Cost? The MTS has been around a few years with that same shock I imagine. I also imagine that all the low mile machines on CL aren't anywhere near needing it, but members here are getting way down the road.

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post #6 of 18 (permalink) Old Jun 4th, 2019, 5:18 am
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Ohlins Recommended TTX Shock Service Intervals
Racing: Every 10 hours of operation. Maximum 20 hours of operation without service and oil change.
Regular street use: Every 30 000 km
https://www.ohlins.com/app/uploads/w...M_07242-07.pdf

Ohlins Recommended Fork inspection Intervals
Normal use: Once a year or every 5000 km
Race track: Every ten hours

Ohlins Recommended Fork service Intervals
Once every 2nd year (or 20 000 km), general: Change front fork oil
https://www.ohlins.eu/download/db/Oh...--00001573.pdf


Rule of thumb: Suspension should be serviced every 2 years or 24,000 kms.
Most stock suspensions needs a first service after 10k to 15k kms. Stock oil (except Ohlins) is low quality and breaks down quickly.

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Last edited by DarR; Jun 4th, 2019 at 5:34 am.
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post #7 of 18 (permalink) Old Jun 4th, 2019, 6:26 am
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TallOne View Post
Maybe a better question is how many here have had their shock serviced and at what mileage? Cost? The MTS has been around a few years with that same shock I imagine. I also imagine that all the low mile machines on CL aren't anywhere near needing it, but members here are getting way down the road.
I had fork service done along with both Desmo services (at 30 and 60 kkm)... I'm embarrassed to say I never asked if they serviced the shock along with the forks.

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post #8 of 18 (permalink) Old Jun 4th, 2019, 8:02 am
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The first thing I did, when I bought my MTS, was respring her. I had it done at the 600 mile service....that was in Sept '12. I also have the suspension serviced every time I do a major service, including fork seal change. Why? Its been my experience that seals last about 25,000 miles and I don't want 'em 'popping' when I'm 2000 miles away from home in BFE.
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post #9 of 18 (permalink) Old Jun 4th, 2019, 7:40 pm Thread Starter
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Rule of thumb: Suspension should be serviced every 2 years or 24,000 kms.
Most stock suspensions needs a first service after 10k to 15k kms. Stock oil (except Ohlins) is low quality and breaks down quickly.
Right, just as Wilbers states in their manual. How many people actually do that? I'll admit I didn't think about it until I crashed my bandit because the rear shock failed and I bottomed out mid turn at 60mph.

I should have known though. My mom sold her old camry to me because it was "worn out." Slapped KYB struts all around and new tires. Picked her and dad up and she was amazed. "It rides like new!"

SO that settles that. I'll be forking over $2K+ for the first service. Desmo/forks/shock. Ouch! But that brings my cost to $14K for a 2015 S so not crying too much. About 1/3 my extra income for tutoring this school year.

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post #10 of 18 (permalink) Old Jun 4th, 2019, 8:17 pm
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... About 1/3 my extra income for tutoring this school year.
I hope you're tutoring at California Superbike School.

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