Oh No! A tire thread! (but for trailer) - Ducati.ms - The Ultimate Ducati Forum
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post #1 of 10 (permalink) Old Jan 26th, 2017, 8:11 pm Thread Starter
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Oh No! A tire thread! (but for trailer)

Maybe I'm subconsciously looking for affirmation of the way I feel right now, but here goes anyway.


I'll be dragging my 5th wheel Toy Hauler to Alaska later this year, and I've been looking at tires. It weighs between 7 and 8,000lbs loaded, depending on which bike is in it. It has really heavy duty axles on it with wet bearings and 8 lug rims. Tire size is 235/80R16.

It currently has LT235/85R16 Goodrich's on it made in '09, and I'm gonna replace them before I head for Alaska.

The guys at the RV repair place said I should get those off of there and put trailer specific tires on it.

I countered with I felt better having a DOT rated truck tire on there over a non-rated trailer tire. They stated trailer tires tow easier than LT truck tires. I don't think they would hold up as well and being easier to tow doesn't make up for changing flat tires in the middle of The Yukon.

And the reviews for trailer specific tires on Amazon and Tire Rack don't exactly leave me all warm and fuzzy towards trailer tires. Lots of blowout stories on there.

So does anyone here have any stories or preferences to share?

(I also have to replace both spares as both came with the respective vehicles in 2000 and 2005. Along with the 2 tires that need replaced on the front of the truck, this might be the most points I've ever run up on the credit card in one month.)
.

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post #2 of 10 (permalink) Old Jan 26th, 2017, 8:36 pm
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I put a lot of miles on the four travel trailers I've owned over the years, always on trailer spec tires, never had a problem. But I am curious what other answers are out there. I've always been told trailer spec tires give better when turning, especially useful with tandem axle trailers. LT tire's sidewall don't want to flex as much when turning.

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post #3 of 10 (permalink) Old Jan 26th, 2017, 8:52 pm
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I used to tow a horse trailer. I always went with specific trailer tires from Goodyear or Carlisle. I never trusted any other brands while towing a live load. I always had good performance from them.

I've got no-name Chinese trailer tires on the motorcycle trailer right now, but combined with the bike it can't weigh more than 1000 pounds. So, I'm not too worried in this case.

Trailer tires hold up better to sitting around. It was pretty rare for them to flat-spot. Tread life was good too. I'd go with trailer tires over LT tires, myself.

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post #4 of 10 (permalink) Old Jan 26th, 2017, 10:21 pm Thread Starter
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Some anecdotal reviews I've stumbled across:

Goodyear Marathon trailer tire:

August 08, 2016
Owned 2sets of these and use them on my twin axle toy hauler that weighs 7,500lbs fully loaded. My first set lasted 4 yrs before belt separation appeared so replaced with a new set of Marathons and only got 2 1/2 yrs out of those before same problem occurred . I feel the tire sidewall on Marathons is not up to the task to give a solid foundation to support the tread belts when making sharp low speed turns. You can see this in the huge sidewall deflection that occurs when you are backing your trailer into a tight space. I always kept my tires inflaed to maximum air pressure and the problem always occurred. So after years of having bad experiences with trailer specific tires, I decided to try Yokohama RY215 tires which are a LT tire. I must say, the Yoko's have proven to be a far superior tire for my trailer application than any trailer specific tire that I have ever owned - including the Marathons.
=-------------------------------------
June 09, 2016
I am a professional special cargo hauler. I tow four different style trailers: (1) 24 ft, 2 axle, 4500lb box trailer (2) 10 ft, single axle flatbed (3) 16 ft boat trailer (4) 28 ft travel trailer camper. They all use 15 inch Load Range "D" trailer tires. I can say this. The boat trailer never had a blowout and the tires will dry rot before tread wears out. The flatbed experienced only one failure due to sidewall bulge. The camper had one episode due to a wheel failure. My "bread and butter" trailer is the cargo trailer. I keep a log on my individual tires by using an paint pen to date and mark starting mileage. I am fastidious about monitoring my tires during a haul and inspecting them back at the my shop. I cannot afford to lose a load due to tire failure. Tire failure is inevitable. And, being a cross country driver, I handle blowouts immediately and replace the tire at the next stop to always have a new spare. This results in buying whatever in-stock trailer tires the dealer carries. Right now, on my hauler are two Chinese "Karrier "Load Star" tires, one "Tow Master" and one "Hi Run BCT JK42". This last tire replaced a blown GY Marathon in Illinois. I have run Carlisle's tires but do not have any right now. Let me sum up what years of hauling have taught me about trailer tires. Its not mileage or time that does a tire in. It is load weight, tire pressure, speed, and heat cycles that limit a tire's life. I spoke with a Carlisle technician several years ago in an attempt to better understand trailer tires. He said if I am careful with my loads (do not exceed tire/wheel ratings), that tire pressure and the heating and cooling cycles of a trailer tire are the critical elements of tire life. He also advised me, as a professional hauler, to replace my specific trailer tires at 7500 miles no matter what they look like. Not one of my tires has made it that long. In my case, it is the heat cycles, because I control load weight, speed, and tire pressure.
==========================

From another motorcycle forum:

Ricky Racer fla

Those guys are full of shit!! Trailer tires are fucking junk!!!
Stay with LT tires!

I would check the alignment on a multi axle trailer though! They can be off quite abit!
---------------------------------------
a car and motorcycle racer, fla

yea, i gave up on buying "trailer specific tires" long ago...regular light truck tires work great!

and as mentioned...tire pressure is the number one cause of blowouts.
========================


I read lots of reviews on car and truck tires, I've never seen anyone griping about blowouts, tread separation or sidewall delaminations (goose eggs) like I have from reading reviews on Trailer Specific tires.

BTW, one of the reviewers said his Goodyear Marathons were made in China.

The only good trailer tires I've run across in Load Range E are the Maxxis, but at $125 a pop, they're $15 more expensive than the Goodyears. By good, I mean all glowing reports. Several people having run 2 or 3 sets and never a blow out or delamination.
.

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Last edited by Dukerdr; Jan 26th, 2017 at 10:28 pm.
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post #5 of 10 (permalink) Old Jan 27th, 2017, 5:37 am
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dukerdr View Post
I read lots of reviews on car and truck tires, I've never seen anyone griping about blowouts, tread separation or sidewall delaminations (goose eggs) like I have from reading reviews on Trailer Specific tires.

BTW, one of the reviewers said his Goodyear Marathons were made in China.

The only good trailer tires I've run across in Load Range E are the Maxxis, but at $125 a pop, they're $15 more expensive than the Goodyears. By good, I mean all glowing reports. Several people having run 2 or 3 sets and never a blow out or delamination.
.
Internet. You know it's 75% griping. Satisfied customers usually don't bother when things go the way they are expected to. I never had a problem.

But then again, I checked the tires for uneven wear, signs of cracking, and pressure EVERY time I pulled it. It's all about being on top of things. Don't forget your bearings and brakes either!

Good luck with your decision. Have a great time on your trip. Sounds like a fun adventure.

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post #6 of 10 (permalink) Old Jan 27th, 2017, 8:48 am
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dukerdr View Post
Maybe I'm subconsciously looking for affirmation of the way I feel right now, but here goes anyway.


I'll be dragging my 5th wheel Toy Hauler to Alaska later this year, and I've been looking at tires. It weighs between 7 and 8,000lbs loaded, depending on which bike is in it. It has really heavy duty axles on it with wet bearings and 8 lug rims. Tire size is 235/80R16.

It currently has LT235/85R16 Goodrich's on it made in '09, and I'm gonna replace them before I head for Alaska.

The guys at the RV repair place said I should get those off of there and put trailer specific tires on it.

I countered with I felt better having a DOT rated truck tire on there over a non-rated trailer tire. They stated trailer tires tow easier than LT truck tires. I don't think they would hold up as well and being easier to tow doesn't make up for changing flat tires in the middle of The Yukon.

And the reviews for trailer specific tires on Amazon and Tire Rack don't exactly leave me all warm and fuzzy towards trailer tires. Lots of blowout stories on there.

So does anyone here have any stories or preferences to share?

(I also have to replace both spares as both came with the respective vehicles in 2000 and 2005. Along with the 2 tires that need replaced on the front of the truck, this might be the most points I've ever run up on the credit card in one month.)
.

Dude! Michelin PR4's rock. Period. Nuff said.

Mike
2006 999, 2007 S2R1000, Ninja 400RR
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post #7 of 10 (permalink) Old Jan 27th, 2017, 9:07 am
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I don't have a lot of trailer experience and the only bad one was with brand new Carlisle tires. Both tires supplied by the (new) trailer manufacturer, were so out of round that the trailer nearly shook loose the bike at speeds above 55 MPH. I replaced them with Goodyear radial trailer tires and never had aother problem.

I am fastidious about checking and maintaining pressure, checking temp at every stop while towing and keeping the tires off the ground and out of the sun and weather when not towing.

Personally, I would go with trailer specific tires and keep close watch on them.

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post #8 of 10 (permalink) Old Jan 27th, 2017, 9:19 am
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If you can fit a higher load range tire or also a taller tire, do it. People tend to overload tires without realizing it. Taller if you have clearance because the slower they rotate the less likely a blowout.

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post #9 of 10 (permalink) Old Jan 27th, 2017, 12:16 pm Thread Starter
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Well, I think I found my answer. A trailer tire as good as a truck tire. Made by a company that mostly makes tires for 18 wheelers.

An ST tire made for trailers in E load range is only rated for 65mph. Trailer tires are made to lower standards compared to the tires on my truck, which are rated for 100mph limit. I won't tell you how many times I've let my rig drift up to 75 coming down a long straight hill on the Interstate when I'm coming home.

These Sailun tires are load range G, higher weight AND speed limit. They seem to be a secret weapon on the RV site I frequent. Even made in China!

So I can let it drift up to 75mph with these, but they cost as much as a truck tire. And it still has to be changed out every 5 years according to the RV geeks.

Wonderful.

https://simpletire.com/sailun-235-85r16-5540993-tires
.
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post #10 of 10 (permalink) Old Jan 27th, 2017, 12:43 pm Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by duc96cr View Post
If you can fit a higher load range tire or also a taller tire, do it. People tend to overload tires without realizing it. Taller if you have clearance because the slower they rotate the less likely a blowout.

Already been done. Trailer came standard with 15" tires. Axles flipped at factory and 16" rims/tires installed. My wife hates the step up.



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