Ducati Dealership Closes - Ducati.ms - The Ultimate Ducati Forum
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post #1 of 33 (permalink) Old Dec 8th, 2018, 4:03 pm Thread Starter
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Ducati Dealership Closes

Bummer Bummer my dealer Thousand Oaks Ducati is closing. Went in today and they are out of business not accepting any service and expect to be closed by end of month. Probably would not have bought my 1260 S few months ago I f I knew this was going to happen. I know there is Pro Italia in Glendale which seems like a very good shop but a pain to get t in traffic (and there is always traffic here). Bike coming up shorty for service so will find out how good they are.
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post #2 of 33 (permalink) Old Dec 8th, 2018, 6:10 pm
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Bummer Bummer my dealer Thousand Oaks Ducati is closing. Went in today and they are out of business not accepting any service and expect to be closed by end of month.
Is that different than Ducati Westlake Village?

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post #3 of 33 (permalink) Old Dec 8th, 2018, 6:34 pm
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Pro Italia is a well-known shop with great expertise, and a long history.
I have had good experiences with them.

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post #4 of 33 (permalink) Old Dec 8th, 2018, 8:03 pm
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Sorry to hear they're closing! I'm down in that area once a year or so and have stopped in there before. That's too bad.

There's also Ducati of Santa Barbara a bit further north as another option.
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post #5 of 33 (permalink) Old Dec 9th, 2018, 12:15 am
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The overall motorcycle market is in the crapper, so this is not surprising especially with a low volume bike like Ducati for which is needed a ton of special tech training and tools for each line that comes out. The volume just isn't there to make any money from it. Two local Ducati dealers also stopped selling them - one just quit to focus on its other makes and the other is going out altogether. The market is about 1/2 in volume of what it was in 2008 and, as an indicator, Harley has been off about 5% per year for the last 5 and it's latest quarter was down 13%.

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post #6 of 33 (permalink) Old Dec 9th, 2018, 10:15 am
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like Ducati for which is needed a ton of special tech training and tools for each line that comes out
Outside of electronics (software) there is not as much spent of special tool as you would think, most models re-use the same tools so there is no need to re-tool for most models of the same brand/type. As to training I would put money on the fact 90% of owners have no idea how little training is given at the dealer level . New year updates are probably a powerpoint for an hour and that's it unless you are a new mechanic heading off for a 1-2 week school to become certified.

The service department makes money (or should) to carry the water for the rest of the shop, the sales floor makes the extra money but often can be what sinks a dealership if you have a bad sales year. I talk to dealer owners who have gone from boon to bust in a short period due to sales of new units falling flat you a spell, Ducati forces/coerces dealers to take on more bikes all the time and if a bike does not sell after any free flooring ends the dealer can easily lose money on the unit. Once they start paying interest on multiple bikes on the showroom floor any profit margin disappears and we all know soon the bike will be discounted to stop the losses ( this is what consumers call a "DEAL").

This is nothing new and not just the powersports industry deals with this, but it is also why you will see dealerships close doors as it is NOT a high margin industry Enjoy and support the good ones because they all have a shelf life. I will be surprised if a few more are not gone by spring given the conversations I have been having with principals. The V4 is the bike that will keep them going as it has great consumer interest, but Ducati uses that to leverage dealers to take more models no one wants. Want more than one V4 to sell? Then take three Diavel's to get another.

If a shop has good service then it can weather the sales spikes better as service is steady, not a ton of profit but not many losses either. Parts are matched by both sales and service. Hard parts go with service but accessories like exhausts are more tied to sales, then apparel is 100% the same as bike sales in that some things sell well and others you might as well donate to goodwill.

A trade mag I just read showed some bad numbers in that of street units in November dealers were still almost 60% 2018 models and another 25% were older than 2018. Given not all 2019 models are out yet and delivered but the old model percentage is troubling especially if those dealers are bleeding money on each one they have. Ducati and Harley have been cashing in on big buck bikes bought by older riders who have the extra cash but as baby boomers get out of the sport (and I see it happening on a regular basis) the sales of big bikes will suffer unless the younger generation picks up the sport and sadly that is NOT happening right now in the US. Maybe the electric bikes will gain new riders to the sport, as long as they drive by video game controller
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post #7 of 33 (permalink) Old Dec 9th, 2018, 1:54 pm
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Electric motorcycles: The answer to the question that nobody asked. The cost per mile all up of an electric car is over $.75 per mile or about $.20 more than the IRS mileage rate which is close to what a gas car costs. Plus, they both sound like shit.
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post #8 of 33 (permalink) Old Dec 9th, 2018, 2:08 pm
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Maybe itís not all because of poor sales. A very popular Ducati dealer in Central Florida recently quit selling Ducati not because they werenít selling but rather Ducati pulled a Harley Davidson deal on them. Ducati came in and demanded they keep a required inventory, allocated floor space and designed/decorated the showroom to meet Ducati requirements. Small shops canít survive that crap.


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post #9 of 33 (permalink) Old Dec 9th, 2018, 2:44 pm
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Maybe the electric bikes will gain new riders to the sport, as long as they drive by video game controller
Ducvet - A well written and informative post. Good stuff. On your last point quoted above ... I think manufacturers who are looking into electric motorcycles to attract riders from the younger, "I'm green too!" generations are making a huge mistake. A complete waste of time and capital.

The younger generations are so self absorbed with selfies, texting, social media, video games, virtual reality etc, that they couldn't give a damn if manufacturers came out with motorcycles that ran on air!

The younger generations lack motor skills in all senses of that term. They have no interest in gas, electric or air powered motorcycles unless they are self driving and completely brainless. What's the point of riding a motorcycle if you can't take as selfie on it every 3 minutes???!!!

IMHO, the smart - and sad - move for manufacturers is to simply downsize and forget the electric motorcycle pipe dream. Or start building virtual motorcycles for the virtual riders from the younger generations.

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post #10 of 33 (permalink) Old Dec 9th, 2018, 10:35 pm
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I think what is going to happen is that you will see a lot fewer dealers and more centralized motorcycle "superstores" in the major population areas. Motorcycles are a volume business due to the overhead involved. The sales trend over the last 10 years is the real telling story - 880k units in 2008 and then between 400-500k in every year since then.

And I agree with Damascus, it's truly a sad story that nobody these days wants, or seems to want, the "real world" experience of riding in the elements, putting themselves at a somewhat measured risk or getting their hands dirty fixing a carburetor. The electronic world in this respect is, to me, a hollow experience and for which you are not really better off for the doing afterward. Maybe I'm too old school in many respects, but I do embrace the technology insofar as when it helps me solve a real world problem to assist with my "real world" experience. Like googling DelOrto parts or what this "thingy" does. But for me at least, technology is not a replacement for these real world things or experiences, it's simply a tool to me, an assistant. It's like looking at a photo of somebody riding the Alps, versus actually doing it.

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